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British WW II Service Binoculars


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Hello Everyone,

Last week I was reviewing some work to be done on one of our lakes with a contractor friend on mine. I have one of those jobs were I get to spend most of my time looking after cottagers around two lakes owned by a Conservation Authority. The only job I've ever had where I can sign out a canoe in the summer or survival suit or snow shoes in the winter. Yep, it's the job of life-time.

Anyway we got talking about how my equipment had been stolen a few week earlier and then returned by the police. With the equipment was a pair of binoculars that I had replaced not knowing I'd ever see my gear again. The contractor said they looked like a good pair and said he'd have to get a new pair for his boat some day. So, since it was my personal equipment, I gave him one pair. Hard to use two pairs of binoculars.

A few days later we were again reviewing some work to be done and he handed me this pair of binoculars. He told me they had belonged to his father and he wanted me to have them. "Consider it a trade" he said. Man, you could have knocked me over with a feather! :jumping:

The case is intact with just a little stitching problems on the top around the leather hinge area, nothing serious. The binoculars are in great shape and have the government broad arrow markings. There is a horizontal line inscribed in one lens with a series of verticle lines running upwards from it. Research shows that at 1000 metres the verticle lines indicate spacings of 5 metres. I would guess this would apply to yards as well at least that seems to make sense to me. What are the opinions of the membership on the spacing?

There are two red screws on each eye piece. I have read that these are electrical contacts used for internal drying or demisting. Can anyone expand on this?

I've wanted a pair of military binoculars for some time now and I hope you like them as well.

Cheers :cheers:

Brian

Edited by Brian Wolfe
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This is the top of the leather case.

You can see the stitching "problems" I mentioned . I've going to leave it alone as any attempt to repair it may make it worse.

The lettering stamped into the top reads,

BINO. PRISM. NO 5

CASE MK 1 O.S. 997

B.L.G.

1944

Any information on the markings such as what B.L.G. stands for would be appreciated.

Brian

Edited by Brian Wolfe
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This is the view of the eye piece end of the binoculars. There is a broad arrow on the right hand piece but you can't see it in this photo. It is just below the red "P". Would anyone know what the red "P" stands for. Could it be the inspection mark indicating that the set Passed inspection? The company logo NL can be seen and I would like to know the marker's name if anyone can provide that information. The eye pieces are focused independently unlike civilian types that adjusted by a single "dialer" between the eye pieces. These you set for each eye them check the numbers on the side of the eye piece and then if they are ever changed you can return them to your own settings quickly.

You can see the electrodes clearly in this photo. How were these used? What did you hook them up to? Was there a "station" that they were stored in like the rechargeable radios we used to use? Would these binoculars be used by infantry, artillery or navy or were they common to all of the services?

Thanks for looking at my new addition to the collection.

I hope you liked them.

Cheers :cheers:

Brian

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Hi Brian,

I seem to recall that the 'P' stands for purged,as in the set was purged of gas/water etc.

I think this was done as many of these sets saw post WW2 use in Korea.

I had a set that was stamped 'W' which I think meant they had been tested for watertightness.

Hope this helps?

Kind regards,

Andy

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Hi Brian,

I seem to recall that the 'P' stands for purged,as in the set was purged of gas/water etc.

I think this was done as many of these sets saw post WW2 use in Korea.

I had a set that was stamped 'W' which I think meant they had been tested for watertightness.

Hope this helps?

Kind regards,

Andy

Thanks Andy, that is a great help.

I like to know as much as possible about the items in my collection.

:cheers: Cheers

Brian

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