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WW I Tank identification, help requested


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Hello Everyone,

I purchased this photo postcard today of a WW I "Tank In Action" (the postcard's title). This is a Canadian Official postcard printed in the U.K. with no date. The finish on the postcard is glossy and is starting to crack with age. I've tried to photograph it as best as possible to keep the lighting from showing too many cracks.

I've looked at several photos but as soon as one looked like a match the next one looked as good! :speechless:

Can anyone identify the tank in the photo? I know there is not much detail but perhaps a trained eye can pick up enough detail for an I.D.

As always your help is greatly appreciated.

Regards

Brian

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Brian,

Not really much to work from, If you dont mind me using your photo i'll ask on the landships WWI forum for you.

Regards Eddie.

The date on the post card should indicate a mark IV or V ,british WW1 tank, female and male versions depended on armourment.

You need to view the rear to get exact date as early one had a wheel to back ,and later were wider and then longer !!

steve

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Hi Steve,

A British Male tank was all I knew, females only had mg's

First info was just posted:

As you say not much to go on. It seems to be a Mk I Male (Long 6 pounders, camo'd sides, full width cab) - so most likely late 1916 early 1917

Unless somone has a similar photo of this tank from another view it will be hard to ID

Regards Eddie.

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The date on the post card should indicate a mark IV or V ,british WW1 tank, female and male versions depended on armourment.

You need to view the rear to get exact date as early one had a wheel to back ,and later were wider and then longer !!

steve

Hi Steve,

For whatever reason there is no date on the postcard.

I know it's not the best photo, it's my first tank photo in my collection.

Regards

Brian

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Of course you're more than welcome to use the photo.

Many thanks for your help.

Brian

Thanks Brian, I took the liberty of posting it already :rolleyes: , the first input can be seen in post #4:

As you say not much to go on. It seems to be a Mk I Male (Long 6 pounders, camo'd sides, full width cab) - so most likely late 1916 early 1917

Regards Eddie.

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Not 100%, but after doing a little magic on the photo it looks like C5 in the red boxed area. That would mean its C5 Cr?me-de-Menthe, C Company of the Heavy Section, Machine Gun Corps at the Somme 1916.

Regards Eddie

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There you go Brian, it's Cr?me-de-Menthe without a doubt. :cheers:

Many thanks to Centurion and Rhomboid.

Input from landships WWI:

I think this tank is 721 - C5 "Creme de Menthe". Frederick Bovill took a number of photos of the tank on 15/9/16.

The photos below shows the same tank, taken at the same time. Notice the shape of the camo markings on the side.

Regards Eddie.

Edited by Taz
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The Mark I's were commanded by Captain A. M. Inglis in C5 Creme de Menthe and supported the 31st (Alberta) Battalion in the successful assault in and around the villages Sugar Factory.

C5, Cr?me-de-Menthe of C Company, Heavy Section, Machine Gun Corps at the battle of Flers-Courcelette (the first ever tank action - 15 September 1916). It was commanded by Captain A. M. Inglis and during the action lost one wheel from its steering tail.

http://www.tankmuseum.co.uk/collectiondisplay_0104.html

C5 Crew

Capt. A. M. Inglis (Gloucestershire Regiment)

Cpl. R. R. Garlick

Gnr. W. H. Stockdale

Gnr. L. McAdam

Gnr. J. Shepherd

Gnr. E. L. Rowntree

Gnr. R. Gibson

Sgt. G. B. Shepherd (ASC)

Regards Eddie

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That is just incredible! :jumping:

I could not have wished for more information than that.

Thanks to all who lent their knowledge.

Cheers :beer:

Brian

Me the same... :cheers:

Thank you

Lorenzo

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  • 4 months later...
  • 4 weeks later...

Hi Christer,

Both of these Tanks were captured around Cambrai

The Mark IV Female (the one in the urban setting) was lost in Rumilly during the Battle of Cambrai. Probable photo date: December 1917 or January 1918.

The Mark IV Male in the wooded setting is not a tank That anybody recognises at the moment. (Thanks Gwyn)

Educated guesses seem to point that the first one was being scraped for spares.

Regards Eddie

Edited by Taz
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  • 1 year later...
  • 1 year later...

All of the tanks in the photos were MkII's belonglng to 11 Co., D Bn. HBMGC and were knocked out on 11/4/17 during the 1st Battle of Bullecourt.

The tank in the first image is 799 (D30), seen between the first and second line of the Balcony Trench system, NW of Queant.

The middle tank is 586 (D28), destroyed just in front of the first Hindenberg Line trench south of Riencourt.

And the last photo is 796 (D23), and is seen abandoned just in front of the Hindenberg Line trench at the SE corner of Bullecourt village.

Many thanks to Rhomboid of the landships forum.

Regards Eddie

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