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Here's an interesting foto of a WW1 Observer in a DLV Uniform. Mailed in 31 December 1934 for New Year's 1935. Think he can be ID'd using O'Conner??

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Notice that his EK2 is mounted backwards! I wish someone could offer up some type of factual accounting for this oddity that we see again and again. I've heard all the stories......... I wonder what the truth is? Why did these guys do this?

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I agree Joe, I would love to have this fellows awards in my sweatly palms.........

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I have a bar that comes close but no cigar! Still, a survivor of German WWI air operations is a rare thing in itself. What were their casualties about 80%?

Edited by Bob Hunter

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I think Rick & I calculated out once that it was 85-90% for actual flying personnel...... a rather severe figure. varies by year, by type of personnel, etc.

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Neal O'Connor could not find the Saxe-Weimar rolls for natives after 1915, and I don't see an immediate resemblance here with anyone in his little group shots, 20 years on for this fellow.

Well, he DOES bear an uncanny resemblance to my old high school Assistant Principal in charge of discipline, 6-8 "Looming Hulk" Moran, but that's another story.

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Discipline....... did someone say discipline?? I thought Mr. Crisp was in charge of discipline...... Nail that man's foot to the deck!

(Remember! The ancient superstition that woman are unlucky on ships is now proven scientific fact!)

(James Mason, Yellow Beard The Pirate)

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Given that there is no obvious connection between both Hamburg and Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Sachsen-Weimar-Eisenach, could there possibly be a maritime connection? An army observer attached to a shore unit might narrow the field a little.

Of course, if we don't know who this guy was in WW1, we know what he was doing in WW2. Professional arsonist, working under the cover of the Allied air offensive. Or do you think it is mere coincidence that the archival award records are missing for Hamburg, Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Saxe-Weimar. :P

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Nah, they're stuffed in the basement of an old air raid tower, currently being used by mice as bedding.... when they are found, we will all weep mightily at what might have been...

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Hi Stogieman,
I was trying to identify the medals of this LW Major, when I suddenly recognised the fellow on the right! Unfortunately no names are given...  
 

LW Maj 111.jpg

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