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An unusual Dannebrog star


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No trace of white enamel. The lettering is flat against the background and there is no trace of enameling anywhere, even in the interior of the letters.

Two possibilities, either a trial piece working with different dimensions or conceivebly a partially finished example.

Paul

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Paul, unfortunately I have to disagree with you.

Until as late as 1909 the official and awarded Commanders breast crosses and the GC Stars were the tinsel types. Most recipients seems to have a metal version privately manufactured. The very early types is most often without the white enamelled center, later on you'll see both types. Regarding sizes these differs alot. The Swedish King Karl XV had i.e all his Stars produced in 50*50 mm sizes as he couldn't bear the weight of the larger Stars. A Order of the Elephant Star with the same provenience is currently for sale at an dealers e-shop. I have myself had several GC Stars smaller than the Star Jeff have.

Yes, the star Jeff have is smaller than most often seen but to me this is a perfectly genuine quality GC Star produced in that size - it doesn't differ in any way from what can be expected having in mind that these have been produced in many various sizes by private order.

The book by Rolf Christensen, "Danske Ordeninsignier" about the different badges held in the collection of the Chancellery shows several Commanders breast crosses in sizes similar or smaller than the Star in question.

Regards, Lars

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But the star pattern itself resembles Michelsen's pattern introduced in 1947.

I have never seen this 'modern' pattern on any older private stars (and I have seen quite a few...).

And the cross itself seems to be 100% identical to the modern type except for the lack of white enamel. Older types normally differ in shape, letters, crown etc.

/Mike

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Hi Mike.

If you check Stevnsborgs recent book (fig. 237, although with a white enamelled cross) you'll see that this (most boring) type with the flat arms is introduced by Michelsen in 1909. My best guess is that this Star is from around this period.

If Jeff would care to take it apart this would probably reveal a date!

Lars

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Hi Mike.

If you check Stevnsborgs recent book (fig. 237, although with a white enamelled cross) you'll see that this (most boring) type with the flat arms is introduced by Michelsen in 1909. My best guess is that this Star is from around this period.

If Jeff would care to take it apart this would probably reveal a date!

Lars

Thanks for the interesting information genetlemen.

Paul

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Lars, you're right. Rolf Christensen's book places this star pattern in the 1940s, while Stevnsborg says it was introduced in 1909. I believe Stevnsborg is correct.

Jeff, be aware that only some of these stars (about 30-40% in my experience) will have a year scratched on the inside. You may also find the word "oppud" followed by a year, which means that the star was refurbished or cleaned that year.

/Mike

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