Jump to content
Taz

Medalla "Antonio Maceo"

Recommended Posts

The Medalla "Antonio Maceo" is awarded to Revolutionary Armed Forces members, in active military service, reservists and retirees, and to friendly countries? military, who with unselfish, firm and decisive combative action had contributed to the defence, development and consolidation of our socialist homeland,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Notice Vic has a different ribbon mounted on his example than the one shown on Lukasz's site. So I can't comfirm 100% that this is the official Council of State issue, it also lacks the name of the medal present on others.

Edited by Taz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cool.

It will/woul;d be interesting to see what sorts of people receive this medal. Is it a merit medal like the US army commendation medal, or more like a bronze star for merit?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Weird how it works out, first you never see a medal you are trying to find for years and then in the space of a week or so this.

here is a Medalla "Antonio Maceo" on the correct ribbon.

I just need confirmation from Vic that his has a council of state reverse. fact is that unlike other medals Antonio Maceo is not on the obverse.

Regards Eddie

Edited by Taz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Vic,

So yours has the same Council of state reverse?

Regards Eddie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perfect Vic!!

So that is the Medalla "Antonio Maceo" only on a different ribbon, not unusual to see that on Cuban orders and medals.

Regards Eddie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:Cat-Scratch: AHA!!!! I wonder if THAT is what is SUPPOSED to be represented by the otherwise ???? home made ribbons on this set of ribbon bars to a Soviet Border Guards General?-- Lst ribbon in next to bottom row--

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The colors are not any more precise than the stripes of the ribbon-- but notice the home made versions of the other "nobody in Moscow has any in stock?" Cuban ribbons here--

Note 1, then 2, then 3 multiple piece homemade "looks good enough" Cuban ribbons on each of these ribbon bars. These remaain the ONLY ribbon bars I have ever seen with what can only be a "2nd Class" of the Medalla Fraternidad Combativa as well-- note the additional white edge stripe as found on other 1st/2nd Class ribbons.

These would REVERSE the proper precedence for what I take to be a Che Guevara Order 3rd class and the (?) Antonio Maceo Medal but those are so close together by Cuban regulations.... :rolleyes:

No idea of the NAME of the Soviet General, but the set of three ribbon bars to him came with two pairs of Cuban Lieutenant Generaal shoulder boards, a detachable cap band, and chopped off collar laurels:

http://gmic.co.uk/index.php?showtopic=10113

so apparently he served, at least for a time, IN the uniform of a "Cuban" General.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Medalla "Antonio Maceo" is awarded to Revolutionary Armed Forces members, in active military service, reservists and retirees, and to friendly countries? military, who with unselfish, firm and decisive combative action had contributed to the defence, development and consolidation of our socialist homeland,

hi, i have this medal, or order for sale if need more info please send replay best regards greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And here is Greg's :cheers: Antonio Maceo Medal:

A silvery wash seems to have evaporated but is more visible in the scans than lookin at the medal itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Closer. Note that the silvery remnants of its finish (?) are strongest around where his nose and cheekss meet. His left cheek and center of eyebrows-- highest relief pointa--are worn through to a coppery base metal.

That suggests that other similar heavy, hard medals are copper under the Staybrite finishes most have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:Cat-Scratch: Wow! Although in the dark 6th month of January light the "true color" of this medal is sort of "dull faded metallic," the setting afternoon sun has just struck it and in bright (COLD) sunlight the color is unquestionably totally strongly "silver!" Huh! :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Blog Comments

    • Brian, Thanks for initiating this discussion. For me, it’s a combination of the thrill of the chase, the history behind the item, and the aesthetics, although this latter factor may seem a bit strange to some. To illustrate this, the very first thing I collected as a kid in the 1950’s was a Belgian WW1 medal, for service in 1914-18, which is bell shaped, with a very striking profile of a very dignified soldier, wearing an Adrian helmet which bears a laurel wreath. It was the image that
    • Thank you for sharing your story, it was most interesting and greatly appreciated, it makes this blog well worth the time to post. Regards Brian  
    • Hello I started collecting when I found my first Mauser cartridges in a field next to my parents' house next to Armentières. I was eight years old.  Then shrapnel, schrapnell balls, darts... That's how I became a historian. When I was 18, we used to walk through the fields with a metal detector to find our happiness. It was my time in the army as a research-writer in a research centre that made me love the orders of chivalry. I've been collecting them for 24 years now. Christophe
    • Thank you for your most interesting comment. The thrill of the chase didn't interest me in the beginning but over time it started to overshadow the act of simply adding yet another medal or group to the collection. Regards Brian  
    • I know the way I got into collecting is like so many other people; through a sibling. I also know that my love of history is barely unique in a place like this. So I know I have a shared background with many people. A less shared area - perhaps - is that I've always loved the thrill of the chase. When I decide I want, say, a 1914 trio with an original bar, to a cavalry unit, the utter thrill of getting out there and, (a) finding groups that fit the criteria and, (b) comparing them re: ranks, uni
×
×
  • Create New...