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Pakistani cap badges


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I would be interested in seeing photos of the Pakistani cap badges for their various corps and regiments. They would be similar to the British and Commonwealth designs.

Any pics out there?

Steve,

Here is a starter for you, Pakistani Corps of Engineers

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Everything in Pakistan, including Pakistan, was part of India until 1947.

Compared to what I see in India, I am surprised (= shocked) at how crude these Pakistani badges are. And I know they can make better. Are these real?

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Everything in Pakistan, including Pakistan, was part of India until 1947.

Compared to what I see in India, I am surprised (= shocked) at how crude these Pakistani badges are. And I know they can make better. Are these real?

Yep Ed,

same name different countries after 1947.

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Ed,

One question, any idea why they still had Baluch Regiment on the badge? And not Baloch Regiment?

Regards Eddie

Because the Pakistani armed forces remained much more British-influenced than those in India (long story there). According to John Gaylor's book, the Baluch Regiment was forrmed from a merget of the 8th Punjab, the old 10th Baluch Regiment, and the Bahawalpur Regiment in April 1956. It has somewhere between 21 and 59 battalions, sources are vague. If the second phase of Ashok Nath's work ever sees publication, much may be revealed.

Edited by Ed_Haynes
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Everything in Pakistan, including Pakistan, was part of India until 1947.

Compared to what I see in India, I am surprised (= shocked) at how crude these Pakistani badges are. And I know they can make better. Are these real?

The badges shown here so far are cast badges that are sold via military tailor shops to the recipients. The badges I will list once I get back to London are mainly die struck so they are much better quality. I lived in Lahore in the mid 90's which is when I got them. The variation in quality among different (genuine) badges is very much a factor on how much a soldier or officer wanted to pay for an additional item. I am not certain regarding the quality of issued items but I do not think it was particularly high.

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Because the Pakistani armed forces remained much more British-influenced than those in India (long story there). According to John Gaylor's book, the Baluch Regiment was forrmed from a merget of the 8th Punjab, the old 10th Baluch Regiment, and the Bahawalpur Regiment in April 1956. It has somewhere between 21 and 59 battalions, sources are vague. If the second phase of Ashok Nath's work ever sees publication, much may be revealed.

Thanks Ed,

Small Pics of badges, are they all Pakistani?

Edited by Taz
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Thanks, Paul. Most of my medal and ribbon shopping has taken place in Rawalpindi (though I like Lahore considerably more) and it was there that I saw and was offered a range of badges, both old ones and new ones and in tailors' shops. Even the worst badge from the nastiest tailor's shop in Delhi is better than these sad sand-cast badges.

Look forward to seeing yours when you recover from the holidays.

While I never got any badges in Pakistan, I still sometimes regret not getting the East Bengal Regiment badges I was offered.

Edited by Ed_Haynes
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As promised I am back in London and here is a selection of Pakistani badges.

First up are the cap, collar and shoulder badges of the 11th Cavalry Regiment.

Next is a nice bullion officer's cap badge of the 11th Cavalry Regiment

Next up is an early transitional pattern bullion cap badge of the 11th Cavalry Regiment

And finally from the 11th Cavalry, some dress officer's rank badges.

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