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Medal Ribbon Attachment Identification 2


Gldank
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I don't think it is official.

The crossed swords refer to a combattant. Comparable with the combat action badge of the US army.

The shield shows the Congo-star. It is not a navy man or a merchant navy man, else he would

have two crossed anchors on his ribbon.

Two options: an unofficial attribute of a belgian army man in Congo (Belgian Airforce) or it was an unofficial

attribute to a belgian officier fighting in the Force Publique (FP : the colonial congolese army) for the belgians in Congo.

The FP fought under Belgian command mostly against the Italians (Abesynia,....)

A lot of Belgian pilots and other belgian military personnel were integrated in the SAAF during WWII

(SAAF) = South African Airforce.

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During the German occupation of Belgium in WWII, the Belgian Congo colony provided natural resources to the Allies such as copper, palm oil, and rubber. Uranium from the Congo was used to develop the first atomic weapons. So, I assumed some Belgian military soldiers remained behind during the war instead of traveling to England. I agree that this is probably an unofficial attachment as I would have expected a gold star instead of crossed sabers and a shield. I will hold onto the medal as it is a good conversation piece. Thank you.

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During the German occupation of Belgium in WWII, the Belgian Congo colony provided natural resources to the Allies such as copper, palm oil, and rubber. Uranium from the Congo was used to develop the first atomic weapons. So, I assumed some Belgian military soldiers remained behind during the war instead of traveling to England. I agree that this is probably an unofficial attachment as I would have expected a gold star instead of crossed sabers and a shield. I will hold onto the medal as it is a good conversation piece. Thank you.

Correct: a gold star is the official ribbon attribute for service in Congo during WWII.

It is most likely Congo-related. It could be from of a Belgian officer or a native soldier

but also from a british soldier or officer (RAF) who flew on Congo.

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