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Strange! Heydrich was in Gruppe II./JG 77. His ?Staffel? emblem, at the time of his involvement with JG 77 was an ancient Germanic runic character S for Sieg -- "victory" and it was this that was painted on the side of the fuselage when on operations in Norway in 1940.

It may be a personal emblem used during his 2nd stint with JG 77 on the Eastern Front when he used his personal aircraft.

The emblem for Gruppe II./JG 77 (the unit that Heydrich flew with) is pictured below.

A short history on Heydrich?s service in the Luftwaffe.

Heydrich completed a fighter pilot course in 1940.

In April 1940 he flew a Bf 110 in the Fighter Group II./JG 77 "Herz As? in Norway.

On the 13th May 1940 he crashed his plane during take-off and was injured. For a short time in May, he flew patrol flights over North Germany and the Netherlands. Then, after another accident, he returned to Berlin. In mid-June 1941, before the German attack on theUSSR, he resumed flying, ignoring Himmler's orders. He flew his personal Bf 109E-f again with Group II./JG 77 from Bălti, Romania on the southern Eastern Front, which put the wing commander under pressure due to Heydrich's position and lack of experience.

On the 22nd July 1941, while on a mission, his plane was badly damaged over Yampil by Soviet AA artillery. Heydrich crash-landed in no-man?s land, evaded a Soviet patrol and made his way back to German lines. After this, he was forbidden to fly in combat, as it was realized that his capture as a POW would be a major security breach for Germany. He never flew another operational sortie.

As to the question regarding other units and unit emblems: All Wehrmacht units had an emblem of some type.

I hope this helps, Alex.

:cheers:

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Strange! Heydrich was in Gruppe II./JG 77. His 'Staffel' emblem, at the time of his involvement with JG 77 was an ancient Germanic runic character S for Sieg -- "victory" and it was this that was painted on the side of the fuselage when on operations in Norway in 1940.

It may be a personal emblem used during his 2nd stint with JG 77 on the Eastern Front when he used his personal aircraft.

The emblem for Gruppe II./JG 77 (the unit that Heydrich flew with) is pictured below.

A short history on Heydrich's service in the Luftwaffe.

Heydrich completed a fighter pilot course in 1940.

In April 1940 he flew a Bf 110 in the Fighter Group II./JG 77 "Herz As" in Norway.

On the 13th May 1940 he crashed his plane during take-off and was injured. For a short time in May, he flew patrol flights over North Germany and the Netherlands. Then, after another accident, he returned to Berlin. In mid-June 1941, before the German attack on theUSSR, he resumed flying, ignoring Himmler's orders. He flew his personal Bf 109E-f again with Group II./JG 77 from Bălti, Romania on the southern Eastern Front, which put the wing commander under pressure due to Heydrich's position and lack of experience.

On the 22nd July 1941, while on a mission, his plane was badly damaged over Yampil by Soviet AA artillery. Heydrich crash-landed in no-man's land, evaded a Soviet patrol and made his way back to German lines. After this, he was forbidden to fly in combat, as it was realized that his capture as a POW would be a major security breach for Germany. He never flew another operational sortie.

As to the question regarding other units and unit emblems: All Wehrmacht units had an emblem of some type.

I hope this helps, Alex.

:cheers:

Very interesting short history, it's difficult to imagine that at one stage his military career was "Normal" considering what he ended up doing, thanks for the info.

regards

Alex

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