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Colonel Kostyrko Railway Troops


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Mikhail Pavlovich Kostyrko, full Colonel. Born on 18 December 1912 in the village of Popovka, Konotop Rayon, Chernigov Oblast, Ukraine. Elementary education and CPSU member since 1941. Joined the Red Army on 20 December 1932. When the ARC was written out in 1953 he was Deputy Commander of the 16th Railroad Brigade and living in the village of Voroshilov-Ussurnisk, Primorsky [seaside] Krai.

Awarded, from top to bottom, a Military Merit Medal, Red Star, OPW2, another MMM, OPW1, Red Banner, another Red Star, another Red Banner, and Defense of Caucasus, Victory over Germany, Capture of Berlin, Liberation of Warsaw, and Liberation of Prague Medals.

Lieutenant on 3 January 193?

Senior Lieutenant in 1938

Captain in 1940

Major on 25 January 19??

Lieutenant-Colonel on 2 Jue 194?

Colonel on 21 April 1951.

Edited by Ferdinand
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The citation shown recommends him for a Red Banner but I don't see what he ended up getting since you haven't posted the approval lines. For Red Banner # 181, 682 probably? He was then Lieutenant Colonel commanding the 15th Independent Railways Reconstruction battalion. The citation praises his dedication, organization, and talent in repairing the Warsaw-Gdansk-Plokhotsin railway line in only 1 1/2 days-- though oddly (the Soviets were enthralled by specific numbers) it does not reveal the actual mileage repaired.

He was a veteran of the war with Finland 1939-40 and retired on 24 September 1956.

Note that his second Red Banner-- for long service--in 1953 was an initial first award type without the "2" shield.

Also-- while none of his ranks shown that designation-- he is wearing a Guards badge in his service record photo. None of the railways units he served in bear Guards in their titles either, so perhaps we might guess that "Independent" was... "close enough?"

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The citation shown recommends him for a Red Banner but I don't see what he ended up getting since you haven't posted the approval lines. For Red Banner # 181, 682 probably? He was then Lieutenant Colonel commanding the 15th Independent Railways Reconstruction battalion. The citation praises his dedication, organization, and talent in repairing the Warsaw-Gdansk-Plokhotsin railway line in only 1 1/2 days-- though oddly (the Soviets were enthralled by specific numbers) it does not reveal the actual mileage repaired.

He was a veteran of the war with Finland 1939-40 and retired on 24 September 1956.

Note that his second Red Banner-- for long service--in 1953 was an initial first award type without the "2" shield.

Also-- while none of his ranks shown that designation-- he is wearing a Guards badge in his service record photo. None of the railways units he served in bear Guards in their titles either, so perhaps we might guess that "Independent" was... "close enough?"

Thanks to all. I find the forum members very helpful as a general rule.

Rick, "The next approvation lines" are void, so I don?t bother to scan the page to the end. Can you explain me that of "the first Red banner order " and the seniority second one,... so he don?t bear the number "2" on it??? :unsure:

Thanks again. I only own the red banner order 181.682 (I?m unsure because i?m not at home now).....and the non numbered conquest and liberation medals., of course.... :rolleyes:

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so he don?t bear the number "2" on it

Yes, you are right. He has two Red Banners without figures. You can see a lot of photos with persons who have two Red Banner and the second one has no "2".

best regards

Andreas

Edited by Alfred
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