Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

Something came up tonight I haven't thought of for a while. When I was much younger I used to get World War II history magazines whenever I could. Sadly I only have a few. But I believe in one of those or a similar magazine there was a very good article on Luftwaffe survival buoys. I've looked high and low and so far I can't find my copy of this. It may be in storage and if so there's no telling when I'll be able to lay my hands on it.

These were set out in the English Channel so that pilots and aircrew that were shot down (German or otherwise) could get to them in their life rafts or by swimming if close enough and inside they'd find all the basic survival gear they'd need to stay alive till rescued... bunks, blankets, dry clothing, water, food, flashlights, equipment to make repairs on the buoy if needed, pumps, etc. Both sides tended to check them so they'd either be rescued or captured depending on who was in them and who found them. From what I understand the Germans felt these should have had the same protection as Red Cross facilities but the British would often shoot at them figuring that if the airmen survived what was the point in shooting them down in the first place. Not making any judgements here... it's just what I read in several articles. But basically that's one reason that they finally stopped putting them out there.

Here's a site I found with a few pictures... but basically what I'm looking for is a picture or series of pictures that I remember from that magazine showing a cutaway (similar to the one on this site) but labeled as to what was stored where inside. It may also have been in color... I just can't remember for sure. Hoping perhaps one of our members may have this and would be kind enough to post it or perhaps a scan of the complete article as I feel it would be of interest to all our members interested in the Luftwaffe:

http://www.luftarchiv.de/index.htm?/gerat/rettung.htm

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dirk_bruin_vl...57602180011317/

Thanks! :beer:

Dan :cheers:

Link to post
Share on other sites

That might have been part of the reason the RAF was shooting them up? A sub-conning tower would have probably been a very sought after target. Who knows...........

I also remember seeing a cut away of these with a lengthy article somewhere in a book. Will keep my eyes open.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A thread on another forum on the subject, unfortunately turned in to something else by a bitter person. You have an very interesting first hand input as well.

http://forum.12oclockhigh.net/showthread.p...highlight=buoys

I hope you don't have to be a membert to view the tread, but if you need to be, I think it is well worh joining and learn other aspects of our hobby.

Regards

Peter

Edited by PeterL
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,

Something came up tonight I haven't thought of for a while. When I was much younger I used to get World War II history magazines whenever I could. Sadly I only have a few. But I believe in one of those or a similar magazine there was a very good article on Luftwaffe survival buoys. I've looked high and low and so far I can't find my copy of this. It may be in storage and if so there's no telling when I'll be able to lay my hands on it.

These were set out in the English Channel so that pilots and aircrew that were shot down (German or otherwise) could get to them in their life rafts or by swimming if close enough and inside they'd find all the basic survival gear they'd need to stay alive till rescued... bunks, blankets, dry clothing, water, food, flashlights, equipment to make repairs on the buoy if needed, pumps, etc. Both sides tended to check them so they'd either be rescued or captured depending on who was in them and who found them. From what I understand the Germans felt these should have had the same protection as Red Cross facilities but the British would often shoot at them figuring that if the airmen survived what was the point in shooting them down in the first place. Not making any judgements here... it's just what I read in several articles. But basically that's one reason that they finally stopped putting them out there.

Here's a site I found with a few pictures... but basically what I'm looking for is a picture or series of pictures that I remember from that magazine showing a cutaway (similar to the one on this site) but labeled as to what was stored where inside. It may also have been in color... I just can't remember for sure. Hoping perhaps one of our members may have this and would be kind enough to post it or perhaps a scan of the complete article as I feel it would be of interest to all our members interested in the Luftwaffe:

http://www.luftarchiv.de/index.htm?/gerat/rettung.htm

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dirk_bruin_vl...57602180011317/

Thanks! :beer:

Dan :cheers:

Hello!

Very interesting.Thanks for posting. :cheers:

All the best

Nesredep

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 months later...

I finally found it. I was incorrect... it was actually in the book Great Battles Of World War II by John MacDonald on page 28 on the Battle Of Britain:

It's a truly neat craft... a shame none are left (at least that I know of). Sure would be a neat mock up project for a high end collector or a museum. :beer:

Dan :cheers:

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Blog Comments

    • Sounds great other than the Orange & Mango squash only because I prefer cran-pomegranate juice.
    • "(...) disgusting herbal concoction (...)" I took note of this description, to enrich my otherwise limited, English "Wortschatz"...
    • At work the standard indian tea such as PG tips is referred to as chimp tea. This goes back to the days when we had a Spanish girl working for us whose command of the English language was extremely limited. One lunch she said she was going to the shop could she get anything. I asked if she could get a pack of tea bags. She returned with some disgusting herbal concoction. I tried to explain what was required but without success. I then remembered PG tips had a picture of a chimpanzee on the packe
    • When I read Lapsang Souchong i decided to post something about these Tea . Many years ago I dont  know about Lapsang until I read James Michener book Centennial and the description of the savour of the Lapasang as a mix of tar and salt & smoked made me proof . It was exact ! and i liked it since then .
    • I have been known to drink Lapsang Souchong and Tea, Earl Grey, Hot... both "without pollutants". I normally have one mug of coffee in the morning, then spend the rest of the day drinking Orange & Mango squash (by the pint). Then evening comes and it's a pint, followed by red wine with dinner and sometimes a drop of Laphroaig afterwards.
×
×
  • Create New...