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James Hoard

Albania- Wied era medals

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So once again it seems that a "reputable" dealer has a medal without a ribbon, puts it on any old thing he happens to have handy and flogs it off as genuine.

No doubt it will not be long before it is all over the net on various websites confusing everybody.

We have had a similar discussion elsewhere regarding two Afghanistan orders. One tries to explain that it is wrong until one is blue in one's face, but nobody believes you.

Errrrrrrh!

Cheers,

James

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http://www.albanianphotography.net/en/dmm.html

An interesting site

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Hello,

interesting site indeed!

For the fans of albanian photography, I can say that at the Historical War Museum in Rovereto (Italy), there is an outstandingly interesting photo album filled with original pictures from the 1912-1913 period, made by the commander of the Austrian military mission.

Best wishes,

Elmar Lang

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<!--quoteo(post=336791:date=Apr 29 2009, 16:14 :name=Bob)--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (Bob @ Apr 29 2009, 16:14 ) <a href="index.php?act=findpost&pid=336791"><{POST_SNAPBACK}></a></div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->Recently sold at auction (Andreas Thies)

http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_04_2009/post-679-1241021679.jpg<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->

<!--sizeo:3--><span style="font-size:12pt;line-height:100%"><!--/sizeo-->Dear Bob,<!--sizec--></span><!--/sizec-->

<!--sizeo:3--><span style="font-size:12pt;line-height:100%"><!--/sizeo-->This is not a medal of Prince Wied, but the Medal ?TO MY FRIENDS?, created by Ahmed Zog as President of Albania in 1925 and given until 1930, in gold, silver and bronze.<!--sizec--></span><!--/sizec-->

<!--sizeo:3--><span style="font-size:12pt;line-height:100%"><!--/sizeo-->Here attached two pieces of my collection.<!--sizec--></span><!--/sizec-->

<!--sizeo:3--><span style="font-size:12pt;line-height:100%"><!--/sizeo-->Best regards,<!--sizec--></span><!--/sizec-->

<!--sizeo:3--><span style="font-size:12pt;line-height:100%"><!--/sizeo-->Artan<!--sizec--></span><!--/sizec-->

On the second photo, what is the pin/medal on his left hand side right above his arm?

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On the second photo, what is the pin/medal on his left hand side right above his arm?
Bob, that decoration is a Zog type Skenderbeg officer grade badge. Edited by 922F

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Here's another Albanian King you may not be aware of yet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_Witte

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Here's another Albanian King you may not be aware of yet: http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Otto_Witte

Bob,

I think the story of Otto Witte is an invention of foreign journals with the complicity of Witte fantasy. To the Albanian journals of Durres of that time, does not exist any word for his arrival in Durres and, if he was arrived to Durres, this would have been impossible !!! Please Bob, the story of my poor Albania is so full of tragedy, that there is no space for him.

Regards,

Artan

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Why you claim your Country is poor?

Please don't spread lies here.........

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Sorry if my innocent post pulled things off track. I just thought it was an interesting piece of (fantasy) history. Understand your point though Artan, the real history of Albania is already rich enough for us not to have such fantasies :cheers:

Emanual, relax, Artan is a valued contributor here and I'm sure he used the word poor purely as a figure of speach, not literally.

Back on topic now:)

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Mr. Emanuel,

Until today, I never call “a liar”, someone who is not present. Just read a few books on the history of WW1 and one can immediately understand why was unfortunate (figuratively “poor”) my country. For example, Albania holds "the record" for the number of armies that have passed or who have fought on its territory during WW1: Italian, A-H, French, British, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek, German, Montenegro. Even a regiment of Senegalese and another Indochina as part of the French army (!!!). All this in a country that was more little of Belgium.

But as always, more you are little, more your tragedy seems insignificant. Everyone feels the suffering of a tiger wounded, but nobody feels those of a butterfly with wings strap.

Dear Bob,

Therefore, I do not expect forgiveness, but I expect the courtesy that the post with the word "lies" be cancelled from the Forum.

Regards,

Artan

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Gentlemen, I would highly recommend you get the catalogue for the March auction at La Galerie Numismatique. The Albanian items being offered there are... breathtaking.

For example, one of the few breast stars of the order of courage... in fact, the one which was awarded to Benito Mussolini!

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I confirm that most of the Albanian pieces offered in that auction, are what a collector in this field could only dream about.

E.L.

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Wied awards in far greater numbers than reported by Klietmann, according to Prisoner of Durazzo & sources as unimpeachable as Madam Durham and the Black Eagle Ordens Sekratar!!! Obviously, Prisoner of Durazzo relies heavily upon the Six Month Kingdom and Madame D's published research! Nonetheless......

Edited by 922F

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Dear Sirs,

I Confirm you that the Grand Cross of the Black Eagle Order is arrived in Albania. It is really the top of all I see till now !!!

Regards,

Artan

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QUOTE (922F @ Feb 24 2009, 15:52 ) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The Black Eagle Order military division was distinguished from the civil division for knights [and likely, officers] by the addition of crossed swords to the ribbon, not the badge. [illustrated in J. Jacob's Court Jewelers of the World.]

There is a portrait of the Prince wearing the badge of the military division on the dust jacket of Heaton-Armstrong's book.

attachicon.gifWilhelm_I_a.jpg

Cpoyright I.B. Taurus. http://media.us.macmillan.com/jackets/500H/9781850437611.jpg

Heaton-Armstrong also says that he reveived the Commander grade with 'crossed swords' when he left the prince's service.

Cheers

James

Dear James,
Maybe is too hard to believe, but those are the medals of Heaton Armstrong. As you can see, hi has the officer of the Black Eagle with swords.
And this is the original colbac of him!
Regards,
Artan

Edited by Artan Lame

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Artan, Thank you for these images!!! Your success in obtaining these images is simply amazing.

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Some time ago, the daughter of Duncan, contact the National Museum here in Tirana, to done at the Museum the effects of his father. I'm interested in it and I pushed the administration to follow the procedures. Finally they arrived in Albania. They are amazing objects, incredibly conserved!

Regards,

Artan

Edited by Artan Lame

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Artan,

Again you have made a major contribution to your country's patrimony!! Thank you on behalf of us all as well. What historical significance! The state of conservation is quite pristine. It appears that the donation includes a Black Eagle knight with swords -- presumably Heaton-Armstrong's decoration? Will it be possible to show close-up views of the sword blade engraving, if any, epaulettes and belt buckle too?

Sincere congratulations on your success in obtaining these valuable historical artifacts.

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Dear James,
Maybe is too hard to believe, but those are the medals of Heaton Armstrong. As you can see, hi has the officer of the Black Eagle with swords.
And this is the original colbac of him!
Regards,
Artan

Wow!

Wuite magnificent. Now I see that the whole of Armstrong's artifacts have been secured for the nation for posterity. Many, many congratulations and best wishes,

James

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That's amazing - and good to be able to display them 'back home' where they belong!

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Excellent! And thank you for sharing.

A good reason for another trip to Albania:)

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I stayed for almost an hour looking and touching each piece.

Wow, I didn't imagine that they had donated Heaton-Armstrong's portrait as well. Doesn't he look a dashing fellow?

I suppose he must have received his Russian medal sometime later.

Cheers,

James

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Dear all,
Meleq Frasheri was an albanian officer under prinz zu Wied. He continued his career later for the albanian state till '30-es. Fortunately, he was so exhibitionist to do a picture in any possible occasion.
I find today another picture of him with the officer of Black Eagle order in his austrian uniform. He served in the A.H. army during WWI. Can anyone help me about the uniform: rank, branch, medals, etc?
Regards,
Artan

Edited by Artan Lame

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