Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Recent CDV acquisition; unfortunately, I do not have scanning capability so quality is poor. My first real attempt at trying to determine clues from a photo; so, lots of guessing in my "analysis."

I can at least identify this as a Prussian artilleryman based upon his pickelhaube (front eagle and ball top).

Rank: I am not an expert on this, but based also on the pickelhaube front eagle (under magnifying glass) I am reasonably sure he is not an officer - my guess an NCO - but what grade?

Regiment: On his shoulder boards I seem to make out the number "18" - and no other marks (again using that magnifying glass). So, my guess is "Feldartillerie Regiment General Feldzeugmesiter Nr. 18 (2. Brandenburgisches)" - but again, I am no expert.

Circumstantial evidence: Photo studio is on card as "Emil Roitsch - Eibau in. S" - determined to be a known photo studio in Eibau, Saxony. My basic internet "research" has the 18th Regiment being based in Frankfurt/Oder. Now those two cities are not all that far from one another; so plausible that this fellow went home to Saxony to marry his sweetheart.

Other hints: He's wearing for sure an EK2.

May not be able to confirm my guesses, but does anyone have evidence to at least blow my guesses out of the water?

Link to post
Share on other sites

3 button cuffs on material like that indicate Foot Artillery (Fu?artillerie). Field artillery had square cuffs with two side by side buttons.

He appears to be a Gefreiter-- all I can see is a rank button on his collar with no higher NCO collar and cuff braid.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rick - on the original, I can clearly see that his collar is one solid dark color (no lace that I can see - I did read about the collar lace for NCOs).

The square of material to the rear of the sleeve cuff - behind the buttons - is a similar dark color as the collar.

So, with the 3-button clue - my regiment guess is definately wrong. Back to the unit search. :rolleyes:

Fu?artillerie regiment ... Th?ringisches Fu?artillerie-Regiment Nr. 18; garrison in Kassel - making that trip home to Saxony for love and marriage just a bit further; but he is a gunner! :cheers:

Edited by IrishGunner
Link to post
Share on other sites

Rick - on the original, I can clearly see that his collar is one solid dark color (no lace that I can see - I did read about the collar lace for NCOs).

The square of material to the rear of the sleeve cuff - behind the buttons - is a similar dark color as the collar.

So, with the 3-button clue - my regiment guess is definately wrong. Back to the unit search. :rolleyes:

Fu?artillerie regiment ... Th?ringisches Fu?artillerie-Regiment Nr. 18; garrison in Kassel - making that trip home to Saxony for love and marriage just a bit further; but he is a gunner! :cheers:

Yes, Fu?artillerie-Regiment Nr.18 (Niederzwehren - Kassel) XI Armee Korps. Their shoulder straps were white with a red eight

Regards, Hardy

Edited by Naxos
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, Fu?artillerie-Regiment Nr.18 (Niederzwehren - Kassel)

If he is indeed a gefreiter of the Fussartillerie Rgt Nr. 18, it is amazing how one small piece of "history" like this photo of an unknown wedding pair can generate interesting connections.

I just did a google earth search of Niederzwehren; I was an exchange student living in Kassel in 1978 and most certainly passed through the neighborhood of Niederzwehren during my teenage "adventures." :rolleyes:

Also, found another Great War connection with the British Commonwealth War Cemetary at Niederzwehren; found the following on a website:

"The cemetery was begun by the Germans in 1915 for the burial of prisoners of war who died at the local camp. During the war almost 3,000 Allied soldiers and civilians, including French, Russian and Commonwealth, were buried there In 1922-23 it was decided that the graves of Commonwealth servicemen who had died all over Germany should be brought together into four permanent cemeteries. Niederzwehren was one of those chosen and in the following four years, more than 1,500 graves were brought into the cemetery from 190 burial grounds in Baden, Bavaria, Hanover, Hesse and Saxony. There are now 1,796 First World War servicemen buried or commemorated in the Commonwealth plot at Niederzwehren."

Not to mention what I've now learned about German artillery uniforms thanks to the GMIC crew. (I thought he was a Saxon artilleryman when I bought the item due to the city of the photo studio on the card.) Of course, I'll never know his name or how he won the EK2, but so far not a bad evening of "research." :)

This comment is probably :off topic: .... but I also discovered they make a special dark beer in Eibau where the photo studio was located. Maybe still a good reason for a road trip to Saxony. :cheers:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Blog Comments

    • I've never smoked a single cigarette in my 62 years so I can't compare, but I can say that I like Lapsang Souchong tea, having tasted it the first time when I was 16, and a sea cadet. I'm not a Brit, though.
    • Lapsang Souchong, when i first tasted this I thought it was like stale cigarette ends...it's an acquired taste for sure.  
    • I like my tea strong enough for my spoon to stand up in. My father got me into it. When my father was at RAF Dum Dum 1943-47 most of his fellow officers drank ice cold drinks to mitigate  the heat, his Sikh batman warned him against it and said that strong hot tea would cool him down, most certainly did. So years later in the UK when everybody else was drinking iced drinks on a baking day the wood family was inbibing copious quantities of hot strong brews of Assam's finest. P
    • Hi ccj, Thanks for your comments. Funny how, for me at least, coffee has become a habit more than a conscience choice. It's the old, "Well if you having one (coffee) pour me as well". When I get together with my son-in-law, a former Brit, it's tea all the way. Thanks again. Regards Brian  
    • I live and grew up in the south (USA) and the drink of choice 7 days a week was cold sweet tea. I was unaware Lipton was British because that’s what most southern use for brewing tea. When I joined the army I learned most people in the north and western parts of the USA drank unsweetened tea and that was perplexing to my young brain. Now days I can’t stand sweet iced tea but it’s still the most common drink in the south, but, you can get unsweetened ice tea in the south. Im familiar with ho
×
×
  • Create New...