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This beauty I believe was used for the timing of torpedoes from launch to impact (or not), but it could perhaps be one used for navigation....or maybe both. It is still functional.

The reverse of this chronometer/stopwatch is KM-marked and is also stamped "65 G" (presumably some kind of serial number). The interior works are stamped "Junghans" within an eight-pointed star; the numerals "68" underneath and a production serial number "48683".

The white face is marked with the maker's name and two sets of numerals around the perimeter: red numerals in descending order ("EU=2hm" - whatever that means); and black numerals in ascending order measuring seconds.

There is also a small timer in the upper portion of the face which measures the minutes elapsed. Interesting to note is that two marks have been hand-inked onto the face of this smaller minute timer at the 5 and 10 minute points.

There are small, round, slightly-raised yellowish dots located under each of the large black numerals which I assume to have been "glow-in-the-dark" material (which no longer glows).

Interesting, as well, is the unique, functional, protective wooden case (also stamped with the serial number "65 G") which houses this chronometer/stopwatch...probably the reason why it is still fully-functional. The heavy-duty cord fitted into the wooden case would be used to wear the stopwatch around the neck in the close quarters of the U-Boat and prevent damage from banging against the metal of the periscope or other objects.

I am hoping to get some feedback on this KM-U-Boot item, especially the purpose of the red numerals, please.

Thanks, and enjoy viewing this item.

John

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Hi John

This is an early Flak timer used by Artillery Units. I do not think it was used on a U-boat. The red scale is a Telemeter scale. They would have been used on the large ships or perhaps land based units. A similar scale is on the Hanhart single pusher Chrono. These are known as the "U-boat Commanders watch", but in reality these would have also been used by Observers on the 'Big Guns' on large ships. Every instrument in Wartime had a function and this red scale was not there for cosmetics. The telemeter scale was used to determine distance of a target. The chrono/ timer was started on the visible flash of an enemy gun and stopped on hearing the bang. A simple calculation would have given you the distance. This function would have been useless onboard a U-boat. Telemeter scales were used early in the War before they were phased out by the introduction of radar.

'EU' (Entfernungs-Unterschied) the difference in distance. ?hm? (hektometer) = 100 m The measuring unit of the artillery was a hektometer.

These are mine

Cheers

Max

IMG_0060Small.jpg

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That is a very comprehensive and interesting response, Max, for which I am grateful. Now I understand the true use of this piece...and nice to see your examples, as well. Thanks very much.

Are you able to shed any light on the serial number "65 G"?

Regards,

John

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Are you able to shed any light on the serial number "65 G"?

Thanks John

There are four different variants of this timer. All have different markings on the reverse.

I would say that yours is the earliest model. The Eagle on the reverse is quite elaborate and unusual to see on these Timers. It is widely accepted that the letters 'N/G' on early KM pieces have the meaning "Nordee Group". Given the very low number, it is possible that this timer predates that code. It could simply mean 'Group', but I am still unsure about the relevance of this. The wooden case is beautifully made and again an indication of a very early piece.

If you ever wanted to let it go, it would look fabulous in my collection! :D

Cheers

Max

www.atlantik-pirat.com

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This beauty I believe was used for the timing of torpedoes from launch to impact (or not), but it could perhaps be one used for navigation....or maybe both. It is still functional.

The reverse of this chronometer/stopwatch is KM-marked and is also stamped "65 G" (presumably some kind of serial number). The interior works are stamped "Junghans" within an eight-pointed star; the numerals "68" underneath and a production serial number "48683".

The white face is marked with the maker's name and two sets of numerals around the perimeter: red numerals in descending order ("EU=2hm" - whatever that means); and black numerals in ascending order measuring seconds.

There is also a small timer in the upper portion of the face which measures the minutes elapsed. Interesting to note is that two marks have been hand-inked onto the face of this smaller minute timer at the 5 and 10 minute points.

There are small, round, slightly-raised yellowish dots located under each of the large black numerals which I assume to have been "glow-in-the-dark" material (which no longer glows).

Interesting, as well, is the unique, functional, protective wooden case (also stamped with the serial number "65 G") which houses this chronometer/stopwatch...probably the reason why it is still fully-functional. The heavy-duty cord fitted into the wooden case would be used to wear the stopwatch around the neck in the close quarters of the U-Boat and prevent damage from banging against the metal of the periscope or other objects.

I am hoping to get some feedback on this KM-U-Boot item, especially the purpose of the red numerals, please.

Thanks, and enjoy viewing this item.

John

Hello!

Amazing find.I like it a lot because i collecting Kriegsmarine.Thanks for showing. :beer:

All the best

Nesredep

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Hi John

This is an early Flak timer used by Artillery Units. I do not think it was used on a U-boat. The red scale is a Telemeter scale. They would have been used on the large ships or perhaps land based units. A similar scale is on the Hanhart single pusher Chrono. These are known as the "U-boat Commanders watch", but in reality these would have also been used by Observers on the 'Big Guns' on large ships. Every instrument in Wartime had a function and this red scale was not there for cosmetics. The telemeter scale was used to determine distance of a target. The chrono/ timer was started on the visible flash of an enemy gun and stopped on hearing the bang. A simple calculation would have given you the distance. This function would have been useless onboard a U-boat. Telemeter scales were used early in the War before they were phased out by the introduction of radar.

'EU' (Entfernungs-Unterschied) the difference in distance. ?hm? (hektometer) = 100 m The measuring unit of the artillery was a hektometer.

These are mine

Cheers

Max

Hi Max,

I have a Hanhart double-pusher chronograph (wristwatch) that had this EU scale and a telemeter scale. I have been looking for the answer to what the EU scale is for and came to this topic. Your explanation is indeed of a telemeterscale but I think the scale on John's is different. It would also not make sense as the EU scale gets smaller the longer the time takes. And I would think the longer the distance between the flash and the bang would mean a bigger distance. I do not have any answers but Entfernungs-Unterschied means something like "Difference in Distance". I hope mabe we can together think up another explanation (or better, I am wrong and this already is the answer) biggrin.gif

Regards,

Neth

Edited by neth

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On 22/04/2009 at 01:49, John Burchell said:

That is a very comprehensive and interesting response, Max, for which I am grateful. Now I understand the true use of this piece...and nice to see your examples, as well. Thanks very much.

 

Are you able to shed any light on the serial number "65 G"?

 

Regards,

 

John

I believe, but am not 100% certain, it is a code for the department number of the product approval unit (Prufstelle)

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