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WOW! Amazing additions as usual Kevin.

Thanks for posting them.

Regards

Brian

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Hello Brian,

I have, you might have guessed, started going through my collection as it is listed alphabetically in my files. I will continue to drip feed into the thread without boring people to death and, hopefully, pick up a lot of new information from others.

My kindest regards,

Kevin

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Well done Kevin - the collectors of these WW1 Specials lapel badges include at least 4 or, 5 members within our forum - some with very large numbers of them. However, I think you are the first to start systematically posting them in alphabeticical order of towns. Always good for reference material. It doesn't mean yours is the definitive set - but when others add theirs, it could become complete.

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Well done Kevin - the collectors of these WW1 Specials lapel badges include at least 4 or, 5 members within our forum - some with very large numbers of them. However, I think you are the first to start systematically posting them in alphabeticical order of towns. Always good for reference material. It doesn't mean yours is the definitive set - but when others add theirs, it could become complete.

Hello Mervyn,

Absolutely. I know that there are large numbers missing from my very modest collection and 'new' finds keep popping up. I have long thought that there should be a comprehensive reference point for SC memorabilia collectors. Here's hoping that this forum may be of some help. My main reason for coming here is to learn.

Kind regards,

Kevin

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Two early Buckinghamshire Badges. A Lapel Badge and Cap Badge KC

Edited by SCcollector

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This is a Burnley SC Lapel Badge in Chrome and Enamel KC. It is a good example to illustrate the problems that we collectrors face in sometimes attempting to identify lapel badges. Burnley was far from not unique in failing to identify the force on the face of the badge.

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Two good examples from Cardiff. I got the Brass and Enamel badge from a seller for next to nothing as he thought it was a cricket club badge. One of my best buys!

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I've added this one to try and generate a bit of discussion and to seek any guidance that might be out there. This is a nice example that I picked up a while ago of a Civilian Volunteer Force badge. I believe that they were worn on bowler hats! I have tried to research this group but have had limited success. My understanding is that following the Houndsditch murders and the siege at Sydney Street there was considerable unease about the deployment and use of soldiers on the streets of London. Very many rounds were discharged by the military. Following this event Winston Churchill (then Home Secretary) authorised the formation of the Civil Volunteer Force who were not part of the Metropolitan Police or the City of London Police. I have also read somewhere (although my memory may well be playing tricks) that they were armed. It is my understanding that they were not Special Constables. The legal standing of this action is therefore very unclear in my own mind. The country was undergoing a great deal of turmoil at the time and there was widespread fear of subversives being at large, but why this particular move was made I am a loss to fathom. That is probably the sum total of my knowledge which is obviously limited. I would be delighted if any other member could advise. Although this is not Special Constabulary in origin I feel that it is an area that might well do with an airing. All help would be most gratefully recieved.

Kevin

Edited by SCcollector

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Kevin - I think we had a number of threads under a post on this Law and Order group - they are quite well known. Won't be before last Feb.

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Coventry At War. A few brief notes.

Special Constable Frederick Barat. Born 14 March 1890 married to Florence Barat and residing at 135 Poole Road, Coventry. Main employment as Park Keeper. Injured during an air raid at Lyhalls Lane, Foleshaw 14 November 1940. Died later the same day at Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital aged 50 years. RIP.

Special Constable Arthur Frederick Matts, MBE. Born 1892. Married to Florence Beatrice Matts and residing at 6 Stoke Green, Coventry. Builder and Contractor and Freeman of the City of Coventry. Commandant of Coventry Special Constabulary. On duty at Central Police Station on 8 April 1940 when injured during an air raid. Died on his injuries at Warwick Hospital on 10 April 1940. RIP.

Police Messenger Thomas Rowland Lowry. Born 1924 and residing at 42 Gordon Street, Coventry. Employed at British Thomason-Houston Company Limited. Messenger with Coventry Police Auxillary Messenger Service. Killed on duty during an air raid on 14 November 1940 at Jordan Well. Aged 16 Years. RIP.

Special Constable Brandon Moss born 5 June 1909 Married with two children. Employed as a builder. Special Constable. On the night of 14 November 1940 on duty with fellow SC at Clay Lane, Stoke. Talking with two air raid wardens when sound of falling bomb heard. His colleague and the two wardens sought cover between two houses whilst SC Moss threw himself onto the road. Bomb struck one of the houses next to where the three men were sheltering causing a wall to fall onto them killing all three instantly. RIP. The house was demolished by the blast. SC Brandon immediately set to work to burrow into the rubble, joined shortly afterwards by a resuce squad. He worked without break from 11:0pm until 6:30am the following day refusing refreshment breaks. Continued to work despite a delayed action bomb, not yet detonated, being some 20 yards away. Eventually he broke through into what had been the living room of the house and discovered three badly injured residents. All three were successfully rescued. He then continued to work through the remains of the house until he broke through what was left of the outside wall and reached the bodies of his comrades.

On 13 December 1940 an account was published in the Second Supplement to the London Gazette. 'The King has been graciously pleased to approve the award of the George Cross to Brandon Moss, Special Constable, Coventry Special Constabulary....'

In 1965 he was awarded a £100 annuity by HMG in recognition of his outstanding bravery. This payment intented to give holders of the George Cross a financial reward on a par with recipients of the Victoria Cross.

Brandon Moss died on 9 August 1999 at Coventry. RIP.

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