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Vickers comments ( welcome to GMIC) are corect in facts - however, care must be taken not to confuse our modern ideas of 'Specials' and have them super-imposed on the past. Policing - such as it was - was multi-layered and Specials were really from the 18th and 19th. C's when public disorder and riots were almost a way of life. Watch and Ward and indeed, the rank of Constable were not as Specials, but as part of the householders feudal and civic duties. Often they paid someone to do this for them - i.e. Petty Constables - but they were never Specials.

The 1663 Act of Common Council was the formation of the 'Bellmen' a paid nightwatch of 1000 men who patrolled from small sentry boxes - mainly retired military, they were fairly useless. Charles 2nd. - who was restored to the throne in 1660 had seen a similar force used effectively in Holland.

The majority of Specials were raised by the different Parishes and if there was no local High Constable to take charge, then this was carried out by the Parish beadle. They had no patrol duties - but, were rather a body of men to deter rioters. They existed only for the period of the emergency and were sworn in by the local magistrate.

Vickers , are you ex-Police or, Special - it's nice to see a new 'face' with an interest in policing ?

With the subject of Specials returning, I am showing a very good example of a Special Constabulary truncheon for the Isle of Man - the letters 'SC' are prominently at the base and at the top the three legged symbol of Manx. This would date from approx. the 1850's and is , of course, Queen Victoria.

Hi Mervin

While the specials are in vogue at present a couple of pictures of badges I have just obtained the Hove Emergency is unusual and the other I am hoping someone can tell me where it is from I am guessing colonial may be Canadian what do you think Brian.

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Lastly the reverse of the badge showing the loops which are either soldered or spot welded in place. I'm not sure when spot welding started to be used, I have operated one years ago but that was in th

Hi Mervin While the specials are in vogue at present a couple of pictures of badges I have just obtained the Hove Emergency is unusual and the other I am hoping someone can tell me where it is fro

Gents I can put a few words together in due course about A&S but in short the area has around 3500 Officers and around 250 - 300 Specials. As mentioned the SC are only differentiated by a selecte

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Mervyn

Yes I was a Special for a rather long time. You are right that the problem with all this is the muliple layers of people prior to the mid 19c with policing responsibilities / powers and with the number of different ways the appointment of SCs was dealt with in each locality. Generally most SCs were called up for a short period of time and that most people taking part in Watch & Ward were not SCs not least because they appointed deputies to carry out their duties but in some places, City of London for instance, they were often appointed as SCs and particularly so where they had any kind of supervisory responsibilities. I would suggest that 'volunteer' or unpaid policing can be traced back to at least Saxon times with the appointment of certain individuals to oversee the good behaviour of a number of families reporting through to the courts in each Hundred and that is perhaps closer to what we now think of as the SC because of the 1832 Act but the British being an enterprising people used the appointment for for all sorts of things in the 18 & 19th centuries. It was the urbanisation of the population that broke the old system down through sheer wait of numbers in towns, London in particular, although if the City of London had continued with the use of the Trained Bands to enforce the law, alldgely a better system than using the City Marshalls, we might have gone in a very different direction. In the 20th Century of course some small Police Forces used SCs as a cheap means of policing, many seaside places used them to supplement the winter compliment of regulars rather than pay out for more full timers and as I have said before there was also commercial exploitation of the office. Finally of course the Observer Corps were an extention of the concept, all being appointed as SCs.

Hi Vickers

Welcome to GMC as you where a Special you may be interested in my specials badge collection see www. thebadger.free-online.co.uk

Alan

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Hi Mervin

While the specials are in vogue at present a couple of pictures of badges I have just obtained the Hove Emergency is unusual and the other I am hoping someone can tell me where it is from I am guessing colonial may be Canadian what do you think Brian.

Hi Alan,

Could be Canadian but I am thinking not because we have a habit of putting the maple leaf on badges especially in the wreath surrounding the badge. It's not always the case though and that's why I say "could be".

By the way, "Specials" are always in vogue, there's just a lot of other stuff on the forum as well. ;)

Regards

Brian

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Here is a Staffordshire Special Constable's lapel pin that just arrived today.

The pin measures 19mm in width and 29mm in height. On the back is stamped the number 190 and the maker's name. Some of the name is under the weld but what I can read is: THOMAS ?????NI, REGENT ST. BIRMINGHAM. I don't know if this dates from WWI or WWII and perhaps if I knew the maker's full name I could research along that avenue. Would anyone know the manufacturer's last name?

The enamel is in very good condition and the only issue is the stud on the back is bent. I'm not going to attempt to repair this as it is not distracting from the appearance of the pin.

I'll post a photo of the back next.

Regards

Brian

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Here's the back of the pin showing the style of fastening device and the number 190. I wonder is this number corresponds with the officer's number? What are your thoughts? The name is just under the horseshoe shaped device.

Regards

Brian

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Thomas Fattorini - well known family of badge manufacturers with branches in Birmingham and Bradford. Judging by the style of the badge much more likely to be WW2.

And they are still in business

Fattorini

Thanks Nick, I rather thought it was WWII but only due to condition, so I was just guessing.

Regards

Brian

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Brian - nice SC badge - numbering could be for the Special - but, probably an issue number. What does the inscription read on Alan's lapel badge - something about marketing ?

Don't know about that but when I checked out the website I got a virus alert from my virus control program.

Tread carefully, thar be monsters here. :unsure:

Regards

Brian

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Hi Mervin

While the specials are in vogue at present a couple of pictures of badges I have just obtained the Hove Emergency is unusual and the other I am hoping someone can tell me where it is from I am guessing colonial may be Canadian what do you think Brian.

Badger

Reference the Crowned SC over ' Department of Marketing and Inspection' badge - The Police Memorabilia Collectors Club http;//www.pmcc-club.co.uk give this a mention in their Newsletter No 127,which unfortunately I cannot access.

The phrase (DM&I) is extant in the Indian civil service,they may have taken it from us in the distant,pre 1948 past.

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This is a Special COnstabulary brassard from the First World War period worn by the Wolverhampton Police Service. Wolverhampton is now in West Midland County but during the Great War it was in Staffordshire. The change of municipal jurisdictions took place in 1974.

The brassard is 64mm in diameter and 79mm wide including the belt loops. The leather belt, or strap, is intact with the buckle though I did not include it in the photo. This brassard was made by Hiatt & Co. B'han as are the other aluminum brassards in my collection. I see from the photos it could use yet another cleaning, it looked fine until is saw it in a photograph. :unsure:

I liked this particular brassard as unlike the other aluminum examples in my collection it can be traced to a specific municipality.

Regards

Brian

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Hi Ian,

Thanks for posting the additional items. I have never seen the PAMS badge, very nice. I have a short article from a magazine regarding the Staffordshire auxiliary messenger service that I will post some day. I need more hours in my day!

Regards

Brian

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Here is an armband from the Second World War era that just arrived. It is made of canvas and measures 45cm from buckle to the tip of the strap, the widest point is 7.2cm. There are no markings on the back as there are on the one I posted earlier. The construction has been of good quality with the arm band consisting of two layers of canvas.

These canvas types from WW II are not as nice nor as expensive to make as the aluminum ones from the WW I period but I think they are an important artifact in their own right.

Not much else to say that the photos won't show.

I hope you like this newest addition to my collection.

Regards

Brian

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As you say Brian - more utilitarian then the WW1 arm bands. Still a good example and in nice condition - any clues to where it originated ?

As usual the seller had little information to offer. It's a shame that the municipality or agency didn't stamp that information on the back, there's not even the government broad arrow.

Regards

Brian

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