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And here's Bernhard Reddemann in the background, the big guy with a notebook and pencil, his overcoat on his shoulder. The flamethrower is the Kleif M.1914. Notice that he doesn't have a Totenkopf sle

IR92 tankard lid............

Brunswick HR17 flask...............(with Prussian skull !!)

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The reason I asked about the giving out of the badge... in my limited experiance "newbies" are often regarded with a bit of hostility in units... and they need to prove themselves before being accepted.

Often they replace a liked and experianced comrade, and they appear all fresh and pimply and full of the eagerness and bravado and mouthiness... and the old hands stick together and wait to see how the Newbie turns out.

When I was in the army the new guys had to have at least one overseas operation before they could open their mouths and be somewhat accepted.

That is why I was wondering that if within the unit you had to "prove yourself" before you were allowed to wear the badge. I.E. if some guy who had fought for months at Verdun and wore his badge with pride... what would he think if the same badge was worn by a guy the day he arrived at the unit.

Same way I think the US 1st Cav division ives a Stetson to the guys who have done a tour, having "earned" their spurs?

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Gruss isn't infallible; he says in that quote that the flamethrower regiment wore a "silver" death's head. The death's head was silver only for officers. The men wore a gray death's head. There's also a white death's head of a different pattern.

But to say that all flamethrower pioneers wore a silver death's head is inaccurate.

I think there are plenty of precedents in German badge making where gray is substituted for silver... Officers having silver bullion and other ranks having white or grey cotton...

I think we would need the oficial statute here.

best

Chris

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When I was in the army the new guys had to have at least one overseas operation before they could open their mouths and be somewhat accepted.

That is why I was wondering that if within the unit you had to "prove yourself" before you were allowed to wear the badge. I.E. if some guy who had fought for months at Verdun and wore his badge with pride... what would he think if the same badge was worn by a guy the day he arrived at the unit.

I think this photo proves that simply joining the unit made you eligible for the sleeve badge. Unless of course this... baby was in reality a stone-cold killer in disguise.

Look how he's crunched up his cap and wears it at a jaunty angle to try and prove he's a veteran.

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Another baby flamethrower pioneer. The seller told me he was from the flamethrower platoon of Assault Battalion No. 5 (Rohr). There's no proof of that, except for maybe the relatively high position of the sleeve badge.

Clearly the badges were awarded to anyone who joined the units.

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The reason I asked about the giving out of the badge... in my limited experiance "newbies" are often regarded with a bit of hostility in units... and they need to prove themselves before being accepted.

That is why I was wondering that if within the unit you had to "prove yourself" before you were allowed to wear the badge. I.E. if some guy who had fought for months at Verdun and wore his badge with pride... what would he think if the same badge was worn by a guy the day he arrived at the unit.

As Thomas already mentioned - everyone in the Regiment was entitled to wear the Totenkopf, for the duration of the war, on the sleeve.

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:cheers:

Dum spiro spero !!

Reddeman mentions in the prolog of his book: "That the former members of the GRPR will proudly wear in their veterans clubs the silver Totenkopf on their civilian jackets."

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Edited by Naxos
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Reddeman mentions in the prolog of his book: "That the former members of the GRPR will proudly wear in their veterans clubs the silver Totenkopf on their civilian jackets."

post-1062-006244100 1295303380_thumb.jpg

GOOD INFORMATION !! :cheers:

Another example of the period use of UNOFFICIAL FW TKs !! :cheers:

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Reddeman mentions in the prolog of his book: "That the former members of the GRPR are proudly wearing in their veterans clubs the silver Totenkopf on their civilian jackets."

Correction: ...are proudly wearing...

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Flamethrower officer's silver sleeve badge.

It appears to have a shadow on the upper right edge of the skull, which could mean that this is a metal badge. Never heard of that before...

The officer one on display at the Rastatt museum is in fine silver bullion thread ...........

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The officer one on display at the Rastatt museum is in fine silver bullion thread ...........

True, but this one looks like a one-piece white-metal badge. It seems to be casting a shadow. Also, it's very bright in comparison to the other officers' badges I've seen. Somewhere in this massive thread are shots of officers wearing the bullion badge, which photographs as a light gray.

Maybe this guy went out and had himself a metal badge cast privately. It's a wartime photo, not a postwar image.

Edited by Thomas W
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I think this photo proves that simply joining the unit made you eligible for the sleeve badge. Unless of course this... baby was in reality a stone-cold killer in disguise.

Look how he's crunched up his cap and wears it at a jaunty angle to try and prove he's a veteran.

Maybe he is already a veteran? 6 Months at the front would not have aged him overnight. Plenty of baby faces on photos wearing an EK.

Best

Chris

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