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And here's Bernhard Reddemann in the background, the big guy with a notebook and pencil, his overcoat on his shoulder. The flamethrower is the Kleif M.1914. Notice that he doesn't have a Totenkopf sle

IR92 tankard lid............

Brunswick HR17 flask...............(with Prussian skull !!)

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Did anyone see this http://www.ebay.de/itm/Seltenes-Bild-und-Feldpost-Flammenwerfer-Abt-Sturmtruppe-Verdun-/281362558531?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2047675.l2557&nma=true&si=0Mfz7Xu57oWFt2A3Isbrn9ka1kQ%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc

Looking at the bids, the winning bidder was obviously prepared to pay more.

Thomas, it looks like it was another Germany only auction.

Tony

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Did anyone see this http://www.ebay.de/itm/Seltenes-Bild-und-Feldpost-Flammenwerfer-Abt-Sturmtruppe-Verdun-/281362558531?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2047675.l2557&nma=true&si=0Mfz7Xu57oWFt2A3Isbrn9ka1kQ%253D&orig_cvip=true&rt=nc

Looking at the bids, the winning bidder was obviously prepared to pay more.

Thomas, it looks like it was another Germany only auction.

Tony

Yes, no sales to Americans. That's okay. My collecting days are winding down. I still buy must-haves, but I've got enough German flamethrower pioneers.

The dealer got very confused about the units. He said the flamethrower pioneer wasa member of a "close-combat detachment," but the cards had the stamps of close-combat batteries, the 77 mm field pieces mounted on smaller wheels and used as antitank guns. The close-combat batteries existed for only four months, since machine guns worked better at close range and field or foot artillery at longer ranges.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thomas,

you write:

Badge in the middle of the sleeve cuff, flamethrower operators. Badge below the left elbow, flamethrower operators of Sturmbataillon Nr. 5 (Rohr). Badge at the top of the sleeve cuff, machine gunner. And badge overlapping the cuff and sewn halfway on the sleeve, grenade-launcher crew.

If I take from your interesting theory of the four skull positions the one exemple of the Sturmbataillon Rohr, how do you then explain the period picture shown on #482750?

Regards

Gilles

#482750
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Thomas,

you write:

Badge in the middle of the sleeve cuff, flamethrower operators. Badge below the left elbow, flamethrower operators of Sturmbataillon Nr. 5 (Rohr). Badge at the top of the sleeve cuff, machine gunner. And badge overlapping the cuff and sewn halfway on the sleeve, grenade-launcher crew.

If I take from your interesting theory of the four skull positions the one exemple of the Sturmbataillon Rohr, how do you then explain the period picture shown on #482750?

Regards

Gilles

#482750

The Rohr badge was unofficially adopted in February of 1918. It was worn below the left elbow.

If a new flamethrower pioneer entered the battalion after February of 1918, his membership in the battalion would take precedence over his status as a flamethrower pioneer, so he would wear the Roher badge in its proper postion. That would require him to attach the flamethrower badge below the Rohr badge.

Or he could have already been a member of the battalion when the Rphr badge was adopted. It would've been an easy thing for him to change the position of his flamethrower badge.

I have three photos of the same flamethrower pioneer wearing his sleeve badge in three different positions.

Edited by Thomas W
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Yet another oddity.

Doesn't fit with known examples of Flammenwerfer, Kampfwagen, Freikorps or Reichsheer/Reichswehr.

Who knows ??

Hello!

According to the pockets upon the jacket, I assume, it´s a Freikorps unit. Do you have a close-up of the shoulder strap, the cocarde and the collar-button, please?

Edited by The Prussian
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