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And the DOA1912 has just EK2 and KO4X (or maybe RAO4X), but in this case, this might be the clue... does Ludvigsen's statistic give numbers for KO4X awarded in 1912... ?

:rolleyes:

Edited by saschaw
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And the DOA1912 has just EK2 and KO4X (or maybe RAO4X), but in this case, this might be the clue... does Ludvigsen's statistic give numbers for KO4X awarded in 1912... ?

:rolleyes:

What was the DOA1912 awarded for?

regards

David

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A nasty little back-country "bit of bother" as the British would say.

Of course Sascha. You didn't get a Ludvigsen? :Cat-Scratch::speechless1: Better be nice to me.... :catjava:

KO4X 1912 =... 6

Now I don't HAVE the Orders Listen, and I suspect these may have been delayed processing awards so that they ACTUALLY appeared (or rather did NOT, since the last published volume stopped in January of that year) in 1913. There were NO officers in ST-DOA who HAD a KO4X in 1913 who did not already have one in 1911...

however there were TWO who show them in 1914 who did not have them as of May 1913--

and one was killed in 1914.

The sole remaining "suspect" is

Harald von Linde-Suden

Leutnant 18.10.04 E1 in Feldart Rgt 6-- plain old "Linde" to 1908

in 1909 he arrived in the ST-DOA as "von Linde" and by 1911 his name had changed AGAIN to "von Linde-Suden."

Oberleutnant 18.10.13 Q3q

Still listed as in East Africa per the 1914 Rank List BUT

and this is where following clues gets tricky, boys and girls :unsure:

he is listed NORMALLY in the January 1918 Seniority List among the field artillery officers as

Hauptmann 22.03.15 J18i

which means he MUST have been home in Germany when the war started. Schutztruppen officers cut off in Africa remained at their old rank dates until repatriated AFTER the war. :catjava:

Char. Major aD, alive 1926... and so far no other awards found for him.

OK, that leaves 4 unaccounted for. Well, they wern't regular Schutztruppen officers (and yes, I've tracked transfers in and out), which suggest they were local colonists. MIGHT be one of them-- but they are "invisible."

Of the 6, excluding the 1914 casualty (Oberleutnant Busse), only von Linde-Suden left a paper trail behind.

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Harald von Linde-Suden had to stay in DOA until 1918. He was wounded in 1916 and put into a POW camp in Tabora. In 1918 he return to Germany via Switzerland. As far as I know he did not receive an EK II, but I'm not sure about it.

The clasp DOA 1912 was for two actions:

26.-27.3.1912 Expedition gegen die Wambulu

8.4.-20.5.1912 Expedition gegen Ndungutze und Bassebja in Nordruanda

Both were carried out by the police troop.

Bernd

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Hi Rick,

These superb pics and magnificent items remind me the excellent article you had posted on WAF. I know the story about it, since... :rolleyes:

But, do you have updated it since ? Is there a place where to see it today ?

Just thinking about this...

Thanks and cheers.

Ch.

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Oh yes, right over on the other half of the GMIC website. Under "Gallery" up at top right of the main page. Click that or

http://gmic.co.uk/index.php?autocom=galler...q=sc&cat=23

Many more things here, especially photos in wear.

My epic narrative style of writing :rolleyes: has not (yet) allowed for "page reading" style in there... and I've been very busy the last few years with the Research Gnome Collective's work getting German WW1 award rolls published.

The section in the GMIC Gallery is the ONLY authorized place for my work on German ribbon bars.

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Thanks Gentlemen for your work However, I'vwe been e-mailed that not only Lts von Linde-Suden and Busse got a KO4X in 1912 (11th June) and had nothing else, but that there's been a third one: Stabsarzt Dr. Pentschke!

So I assume we cannot norrow it down to one? Well, two or three is also not bad... thanks! :cheers:

PS:

I alway wonderded when they started to produce mini battle clasps for the 1915 ribbon bars... it seems they startet outright.

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  • 2 months later...

Here is one set of swords on the buttonaire. I haven't seen this type of "fat" swords before!unsure.gif Also quick look to Rick's gallery didn't helped. So, maybe something what you would like to add?

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