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On 8/12/2009 at 17:29, Noor said:

Hi guys,

 

Here is my today's arrivals - all nice U.S. ribbon bars. But because I don't know much about that area, can you please have a look, confirm that I got ribbons right, help to ID some and if you don't mind, please feel free to add some extra information about them.

 

Ok, lets start....

 

Bar No. 1

 

Nice 13 award ribbons/5 row bar on the felt. I presume this owner was officer, am I correct?

 

Awards;

1. Legion of Merit (??????)

2. Silver Star

3. Bronze Star

4. Army Commendation Medal

5. Army Good Conduct Medal

6. American Defence Service Medal

7. American Campaign Medal

8. European - Africa - Middle Eastern Campaign Medal (Star on it means battles?)

9. World War II Victory Medal

10. Army of Occupation Medal

11. National Defence Service Medal (what this leave indicate?)

12. Korean Service Medal with two stars (Stars again?)

13. United Nations Service Medal (for Korea?)

 

 

img553a.JPG

 

First off, nice ribbon bar.  This guys was most likely an officer, WW2 and Korean Veteran.  Silver Stars are pretty easy to track down because they are all recorded, however, without a name, you may have a tough time.

To answer your questions

1) Oakleaf on the NSDM:  Means a second award, however, this owner did not know the regulations because the NDSM normally has a Bronze Service star on it.  

2) The Korean Service medal seems to have one Silver Campaign star and one Bronze and does the EMEACM (has one Bronze Star)  This means that this person qualified for 6 battle campaigns during the Korean Conflict.  My Grandpa has 4x Bronze Campaign Stars on his. 

3)  The last ribbon is the UN Medal for Korea.

 

Hope this helps.

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Here's a set, my father's.  I've eight of these sets,oddly, only one sports a national defense ribbon (obviously not this one) . . . guess he didn't like it.

Because I still struggling with the time difference between Ireland and Asia, I totally forgot that actually one of the bars is named Capt. Duncan - Marine Exp. Nice and interesting awards;

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On ‎9‎/‎4‎/‎2016 at 08:57, Sal said:

Another interesting set with the scarce AF Outstanding Airman of the Year award dead center of the ribbons

 

image.jpeg

I find this a particular interesting Ribbon Bar.  IWhat makes this interesting is that he has a Vietnam Campaign Medal and a NDSM w/o a Bronze Service Star as well as a AFEM.  This lineage on this bar has quite a story.    With the amount of Air Medals that he has, this person was surely a pilot.  Funny thing with pilots is that if they fly over a certain deployment zone, they qualify for the award, unlike ground troops normally have to be on ground and not near the deployment zone to be awarded the campaign medal. I would be interested to see what deployment zone he was supporting as a aviator to earn the AFEM.

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On September 6, 2016 at 11:47, ostprussenmann_new said:

I find this a particular interesting Ribbon Bar.  IWhat makes this interesting is that he has a Vietnam Campaign Medal and a NDSM w/o a Bronze Service Star as well as a AFEM.  This lineage on this bar has quite a story.    With the amount of Air Medals that he has, this person was surely a pilot.  Funny thing with pilots is that if they fly over a certain deployment zone, they qualify for the award, unlike ground troops normally have to be on ground and not near the deployment zone to be awarded the campaign medal. I would be interested to see what deployment zone he was supporting as a aviator to earn the AFEM.

Not only pilots, flight crew qualified too- and I would bet this guy ended his career as a Major. Note The USAAC good conducts- followed by only one USAF good conduct-6/9 years total enlisted time. But two NCO schools AND 24 years (+) based on the longevity ribbon. Career from@ 1953-1978-ish? When was the long tour deployment ribbon created? 

Edited by Ulsterman
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I just got service papers for a Navy man - Korea and Vietnam.  His record states ""1 Oak Leaf Cluster" for his National Defense Medal.

On 8/14/2016 at 17:12, Hugh said:

Please tell me you have this man's story and are going to publish it here.  

Probably enlisted before 7 December 1941.  Maybe an aviator or air crew with service in WW II and Korea, but not Vietnam.  No stars nor strike/flight on his Air Medal so maybe not a designated aviator.  Maybe an artillery spotter.  Lots of campaign stars but no "V" on his Bronze Star.  Mention in Despatches on his British War Medal.  Maybe wound up his career as an attache or other extended service in Italy.  Lots of anomalies to puzzle over.  

Hugh

MBE/OBE and War Medal with MID must mean service with a British or Commonwealth unit with no active service.

Michael

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57 minutes ago, Michael Johnson said:

I just got service papers for a Navy man - Korea and Vietnam.  His record states ""1 Oak Leaf Cluster" for his National Defense Medal.

MBE/OBE and War Medal with MID must mean service with a British or Commonwealth unit with no active service.

Michael

Are we talking about Post 147?  Hard to see that guy as Navy.  He has no Navy specific awards, and uses mostly oak leaf clusters instead of stars for second awards as would be normal for a Navy guy.  I'm confused.

Hugh

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On ‎12‎/‎5‎/‎2016 at 22:18, Paul R said:

Oakleaf clusters are for the Army or Army Air Corps.  The naval branches used stars.  

This is true, however, Campaign and Service Medals will always have a small Bronze Service Star Device (ie: National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam Campaign Medal, Iraq and Afghanistan Campaign Medals) no matter what service.

As for Joint Awards, like the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Joint Commendation Medal, etc, will always use a Oakleaf Cluter no matter what service.

6 hours ago, Sal said:

A nice Vietnam custom set

 

IMG_2369.JPG

This is one of the nicest Vietnam Era Ribbons bars that I have seen.  Only thing missing from it is on the last Ribbon (1960 Streamer).

On ‎12‎/‎5‎/‎2016 at 19:58, Michael Johnson said:

I just got service papers for a Navy man - Korea and Vietnam.  His record states ""1 Oak Leaf Cluster" for his National Defense Medal.

MBE/OBE and War Medal with MID must mean service with a British or Commonwealth unit with no active service.

Michael

This is normally the case, however, this is definitely a clerical error.  It would rate a Bronze Service Star, however, if you would build or aquire a ribbon bar with his exact awards, I would put a OLC as his records states.

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On 3/3/2017 at 05:55, ostprussenmann_new said:

This is true, however, Campaign and Service Medals will always have a small Bronze Service Star Device (ie: National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam Campaign Medal, Iraq and Afghanistan Campaign Medals) no matter what service.

As for Joint Awards, like the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Joint Commendation Medal, etc, will always use a Oakleaf Cluter no matter

3

Correct.  Beautiful ribbon bars. 

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Hello

I found this ribbon bar in a antique market, not sure if its real or the ribbons are in the correct order.

 

From the research i have done they are.

1.Joint Services Commedation

2. Air Force Commendation (With bronze oak)

3.Presedential Citation

4.AirForce Outstanding Unit (3 Bronze oaks)

5. Air Force Good Conduct

6 National Defence Medal

7 Armed Forces Expeditionary

8.Air Force Overseas Short Tour (With Bronze Oak)

9 Air Force Overseas Long Tour (with bronze OaK)

10 Air Force Longevity (3 Bronze oaks)

11 Air Force NCO Profesional Military Education Graduate

12 Air Force Small Arms Expert

13 Air Force Training

IMAG1478.jpg

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The Longevity and Good Conduct don't match up.  The Longevity indicates 16 years service (basic ribbon=4 years with each cluster=4 years, hence 16 years)  

The Good Conduct indicates 3 years service (basic ribbon=3 years). SO-the Good Conduct should have 4 bronze oak leaf clusters indicating 15 years service).

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On June 12, 2017 at 22:13, speagle said:

The Longevity and Good Conduct don't match up.  The Longevity indicates 16 years service (basic ribbon=4 years with each cluster=4 years, hence 16 years)  

The Good Conduct indicates 3 years service (basic ribbon=3 years). SO-the Good Conduct should have 4 bronze oak leaf clusters indicating 15 years service).

Actually- no- it means he went to OCS and became an officer.  I see LOTs of these bars weekly. A Tip- USAFA prior enlisted who have been selected for the academy have a star on their basic training ribbons, as they have to do it twice. 

Given whats there-and not there- @(1976-1981) to (1996-2001) career range. I think the scond star to the NDSM was authorized very swiftly after 9/11/2001. 

Also- I think the old USAF good conduct was given for 4 years- but changed to three in 1996? 

This guy was a Major- maybe a rising Lt. Col. and this was his/ her bar upon retirement, because who adds the final cluster to their longevity ribbon after they discharge? 

Edited by Ulsterman
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Another interesting but unattributed. The Selective Service Medal on the set is scarce for active personnel except for those serving in specific positions 

 

IMG_1289.JPG

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Interesting bar.  Id expect to see a NDSM.  Legion of Merit, as you  know, is a very high medal, which came out in late 1942.  I'd find it highly unusual for an officer to earn two during the war, especially without a "V" device.  Also, with the Selective Service medal... post war service... unless he earned it as a civilian after the war and mounted it with his ribbons?

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I questioned as well but do know there were select officers eligible as the military leaders providing higher level management of boards etc. I thought as a reserve officer may have been volunteer in his civilian capacity and the second LOM may be a retirement type award. 

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Yup. There were about 30 regular officers assigned to assist with the implementation if the draft in 1940/41. Most were junior officers. I just read an obit. of one who pulled the first draft numbers in front of FDR himself. They all got the Selective Service medal. 

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I'm interested in thoughts about the USAF Commendation medal on the top row.

This medal was authorized by the Secretary of the Air Force on March 28, 1958 while serving in any capacity with the Air Force after March 24, 1958.

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Hello

 

I have a new Ribbon Bar, which I know isnt entirely american, but does seem to have an american ribbon on it.

Seeing that its both British and American, i am wondering how this can be, especially WW1?

 

Does anyone have any insight on this please?

IMG_20171118_154009.jpg

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54 minutes ago, granty1988 said:

Hello

 

I have a new Ribbon Bar, which I know isnt entirely american, but does seem to have an american ribbon on it.

Seeing that its both British and American, i am wondering how this can be, especially WW1?

 

Does anyone have any insight on this please?

IMG_20171118_154009.jpg

It is actually not WW1 but WW2. The ribbons are from left to right:

1 - British "1939-1945 Star" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1939–1945_Star

2 - British "France and Germany Star" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1939–1945_Star

3 - USA "World War 2 Victory Medal" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II_Victory_Medal_(United_States)

Edited by BalkanCollector
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