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Brit flying ace sells medals...


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Well it is a shame that he has been forced to sell them, but he may as well benefit from them now rather than when he is dead. He has no family to leave them to, so lets hope they have enough health between them to enjoy their last years together in comfort.

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  • 2 years later...

Well it is a shame that he has been forced to sell them, but he may as well benefit from them now rather than when he is dead. He has no family to leave them to, so lets hope they have enough health between them to enjoy their last years together in comfort.

very sad

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Well it is a shame that he has been forced to sell them, but he may as well benefit from them now rather than when he is dead. He has no family to leave them to, so lets hope they have enough health between them to enjoy their last years together in comfort.

Sentiments I totally agree with. They are of no practical (If maybe sentimental) use stuck in a draw. without any family to pass down to, (who may, or may not have treasured them), why not sell them and reap some benefit, after all he obviously earned them, just a shame that hero's are soon forgotten by the nation they fought, were maimed or died for.

regards

Alex

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I thought that nationalized health care was supposed to be free.

Agreed and correct to a point, unfortunately treatments or medication has to be seen to be "Cost effective" or "Value for money". There are many treatments and medicines which are available but unfortunately they are deemed to be neither of the aforementioned, so are basically not available on the NHS, if you want it, you have to pay for it. This sort of treatment denial happens quite frequently until sometimes enough "stink" is generated, normally by the media that occassionally the decision is reversed.

regards

Alex

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"Some animals are more equal than others."

I'd quote other wisdom: "You can't always get what you want. But, sometimes, you just might find, you get what you need."

It is sad he has to sell, but at least he'll get something out of them and they won't wind up buried in some bumbling museum's back room. I know of several notable WWII gallantry groups, sold at DNW, purchased by collectors, but retained, by joint agreement, in DNW's valuts for the recipient to wear, when he wishes, for his lifetime.

Edited by Ed_Haynes
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but retained, by joint agreement, in DNW's valuts for the recipient to wear, when he wishes, for his lifetime.

But if memory serves me right, didn't just this thing happen to a Ghurka vet who "Loaned" his medals, including his VC to his old regiment, who prompty claimed them as a gift and he never saw them again, and was refused the chance to wear them? additionally because he was not a British citizen he was not allowed to come to Britain to seek any medical treatment in the UK. Sure it's a thread on this site somewhere.

regards

Alex

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But if memory serves me right, didn't just this thing happen to a Ghurka vet who "Loaned" his medals, including his VC to his old regiment, who prompty claimed them as a gift and he never saw them again, and was refused the chance to wear them? additionally because he was not a British citizen he was not allowed to come to Britain to seek any medical treatment in the UK. Sure it's a thread on this site somewhere.

regards

Alex

No, actually, to make a long and tawdry story short: The British officers of his regiment bilked him out of his gropup, enticed him to donate it to the "Regimental Association" making him think that association had anything to do with him, and then they donated it to the museum that seems to care not at all for him. Rather like the British officers who plundererd the regimental silver of those Gorkha regiments remaining with the Indian Army, but that's another tale. A nasty story here, in which no one is clean, but the tricked Gorkha is the ultimate victim (as, perhaps, he has always been?).

Oh, this may anger some,. should I edit my post, . . . . :rolleyes:

Edited by Ed_Haynes
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No, actually, to make a long and tawdry story short: The British officers of his regiment bilked him out of his gropup, enticed him to donate it to the "Regimental Association" making him think that association had anything to do with him, and then they donated it to the museum that seems to care not at all for him. Rather like the British officers who plundererd the regimental silver of those Gorkha regiments remaining with the Indian Army, but that's another tale. A nasty story here, in which no one is clean, but the tricked Gorkha is the ultimate victim (as, perhaps, he has always been?).

Oh, this may anger some,. should I edit my post, . . . . :rolleyes:

To be honest no I don't think you need to edit your post, My posting was based on recollections but you seem to have got the story slightly more "right". I was working from memory, having said that the poor Ghurka vet still got stitched and was denied treatment on our great NHS as I recall

regards

Alex

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