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WWI Paint Schemes

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I need to restore a schlitten. It is in perfect condition other than being completely painted in an odd whitish/grey paint - not original. Normally it would be good to keep as is but this 'colour' must go. Does anyone have any modern paint codes/examples that match as best as possible the original colours. I have not decided whether to go plain or mimikri!

VMT

Mark

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Go with plain.

If you go with plain it looks well restored... and you know it looks just like it once did.

If you try homemade cammo patters it will be (and will always remain) your "fantasy" piece as you will never have it as the gun looked all those years ago.

I did my 08 and sledge lomax field grey and have never regretted it.

Cammo would maybe be "cool"... but would always in the back of your head look faked.

best

Chris

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Chris thanks. I think you are right.

lomax field grey?

What is this paint/ Does it have a European code id perhaps?

Mark

ps please let me see image of your 'results'?

Mark

Go with plain.

If you go with plain it looks well restored... and you know it looks just like it once did.

If you try homemade cammo patters it will be (and will always remain) your "fantasy" piece as you will never have it as the gun looked all those years ago.

I did my 08 and sledge lomax field grey and have never regretted it.

Cammo would maybe be "cool"... but would always in the back of your head look faked.

best

Chris

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Chris any update please on how to correctly identify lomax field grey?

Many thanks.

Mark

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hi,

sorry, forgot this one.

Its a seller called "lomax antik" or lomax antiques or something on German ebay.

sells mainly fakes... but the field grey paint is good.

Best

Chrs

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Mark,

I cannot say that I have ever seen a field gray painted sled that had it's original paint. Most of these sleds were reworked over the years and painted field gray at this time. Most of the original condition sleds I have seen have are missing their paint. My sled still had about 60 percent of it's original paint and that was a faded battleship gray! The only paint visible under that was red primer! The Durkopp makers plates were rivited to the side panels and showed no signs of having been painted over. Even my original flash shield for the booster has the same color original paint of what paint remains. If I were you, I would go with that.

Dan

Edited by Daniel Murphy

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Dan thanks for input. I (and no doubt many others) would love to see your images? The light grey (battleship grey) is interesting. Do you really think this was a colour that the kit was painted in then shipped out to the field? It is not the first sled that I have heard of in this colour so I am beginning to think it is an original paint scheme. Could you date the period of this colour do you think? as I am still endeavouring to get this ''olive'' field grey/lomax green colour.

Email me on mark.finneran@hotmail.co.uk if you wish to send pictures privately.

Best wishes to all for Christmas.

Mark

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