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At fisrt I thought it was a typo.... but no... this guy WAS in Infantry regiment 603 !?!?!?!?!?!?!

http://cgi.ebay.de/Militaerpass-1Wk-InftrRgt-603-Hildesheim-Freikorps-Bremen_W0QQitemZ290366264427QQcmdZViewItemQQptZB%C3%BCro_Papier_Schreiben?hash=item439b2d946b

Someone help me! I cannot fond it anywhere.... yet the entries are 100% kosher in the book, even the stamps!

What the hell is it!?!?!?

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Chris,

You need some new books dude. There was a whole series of 600 numbered infantry units. If you think that is interesting, what do you think about this?

Chip

Edited by Chip
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Chris,

You need some new books dude. There was a whole series of 600 numbered infantry units. If you think that is interesting, what do you think about this?

Chip

Hi,

ouch! It seems so!

Can you suggest any books that have these Regiments mentioned?

Thanks

Chris

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And he has the 600 series?

Cron has been the Bibel for years and he makes no mention of them at all.

Ruhmeshalle does not have them,

Have never seem them ,mentioned in any history of East or West front...

251 divs does not have them,

just what WERE the 600 series regiments? Why does it have a town name associated with it?

Best

Chris

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Rottgardt' division series (volume 6) has LOTs of information on these (mostly footnotes).

I own a goodly chunk of paperwork for one of the 600s and my ambition is to one day read, organize and publish a summary of the box of stuff associated with its commander.

"Towards the end of 1916, there were indications that the Allies might try to land an invasion force via Denmark or Holland and that these nations (esp. Denmark) might enter the war on the wrong side!

In December 1916 the Army High Command ordered the creation of the 603rd, 604th,605th, 609th and 610th Infantry regiments from Ersatz battalions at home. The 601st, 602nd, 606th,607th and 611th to 614th Landsturm Infantry regiments (there was no 608th) were combined from existing independent Landsturm battalions.

In January 1917 followed the 613th to 627th Infantry regiments. The 621st and 622nd were Saxon, the 627th from Wurtemberg. All regiments consisted of older men fit only for garrison duty and of older Landsturm men. They were intended as guards for the northern coastlines.

However, due to losses, some of these regiments were joined into the 501st to 506th Infantry Brigades of the 251st-253rd Infantry Divisions raised in January, 1917.

Which troops of other arms might have belonged to these divisions is in principle not known. However, those large formations never appeared on the battle fronts. They were never intended for such service, stayed immobile and were disbanded again on Feb. 25th, 1918. So, they usually do not figure in German Inventories of the Infantry Divisions of World War One.

The 251st Infantry Division consisted of 501st and 502nd Infantry Brigades. the 501st Brigade was made up of the 601st and 602nd Landsturm IRs. The 502nd Infantry Brigade was made up of the 603rd and 604th Infantry Rgts. Engineers attached to the 251ID were the 378th and 379th Pioneer companies.

The 603rd IR was raised on December 5th 1916 by the 10th Corps district and disbanded on Feb. 25th, 1918. Replacements were sent from the 1st Ersatz Bn./91st Infantry Rgt. (Oldenburg 10th Corps district).

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Chris,

So you see why "251 Divisions..." does not have these regiments. Their divisions are not listed! They are, however, listed in Kraus on page 470 and in Cron's "Die Organisation des deutschen Heeres im Weltkrieg, heft 5". Though not specifically mentioned by unit number, he does discuss their specific brigades and divisions in reference to the Küstenschutz.

Ulstermann,

Thanks for adding this information. I'm not familiar with Nafzier. Could you give us the rest of the information about this reference? (title, publisher, date, etc.)

Heiko,

There were a few 900 series FARs, but this unit is most likely one of the 900 series munitions columns. They also wore normal looking FAR shoulder straps. FAR straps were numbered well into the 1000 series.

Chip

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There were a few 900 series FARs, but this unit is most likely one of the 900 series munitions columns. They also wore normal looking FAR shoulder straps. FAR straps were numbered well into the 1000 series.

Chip

And the Fussartillerie joins the above-1000 numbered series: http://cas.awm.gov.a...raldry/REL24390

Although, in this case, I believe the shoulder strap represents Fussartillerie Batterie 1005 (instead of a regiment).

Edited by IrishGunner
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  • 1 month later...

There were a few 900 series FARs, but this unit is most likely one of the 900 series munitions columns. They also wore normal looking FAR shoulder straps. FAR straps were numbered well into the 1000 series.

Chip

Chip,

Why do you say this is a munitions column unit? Too high to be a 900-series FAR?

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Chip,

Why do you say this is a munitions column unit? Too high to be a 900-series FAR?

Rick,

According to my reference, there was no artillery unit with the number 934. As mentioned, there were 900 series field artillery units, but only a relatively small number. Not anywhere near all of the series numbers were used. On the other hand, the munitions columns were numbered consecutively 900-999.

Chip

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Rick,

According to my reference, there was no artillery unit with the number 934. As mentioned, there were 900 series field artillery units, but only a relatively small number. Not anywhere near all of the series numbers were used. On the other hand, the munitions columns were numbered consecutively 900-999.

Chip

So, you wouldn't happen to have a list of all artillery units would you? I mean including reserve, independent battalions, independent batteries, etc, etc, etc? Each and every one? :whistle:

Just kidding... :rolleyes: But I sure could use one of those...

Actually, I just received a post card of a group of new kanonieren - all dressed in Dunkelblau with what appear to be white shoulder straps - can make a 75 one one strap. I know there was a Fussartillerie Battalion 75; could this be it? (Will try to post photo this weekend after a trip to Krakow.)

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Rick,

Actually, I do have a complete list. ;)

There was no white 75th foot artillery strap. One would only expect to see the prewar numbers on a Dunkelblau tunic. Perhaps when you show the photo a better assessment can be made.

Chip

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Rick,

Actually, I do have a complete list. ;)

There was no white 75th foot artillery strap. One would only expect to see the prewar numbers on a Dunkelblau tunic. Perhaps when you show the photo a better assessment can be made.

Chip

Will you share the list? :catjava:

No 75 foot? :unsure: Ok, will post as soon as I can... (Which means getting photographer wifey to help.)

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Rick,

Actually, I do have a complete list. ;)

There was no white 75th foot artillery strap. One would only expect to see the prewar numbers on a Dunkelblau tunic. Perhaps when you show the photo a better assessment can be made.

Chip

Chip; because of the paper the photo is printed upon, getting a good digital image is difficult. (Yes, I know Rick Research - Epson :whistle:)

But... I have found that the Infantrie Regiment Nr. 75 is from Bremen. And the postcard was printed in Bremen. I am 100 percent positive of the light colored shoulder strap with only a 75 on it. I have seen one image that has the Inf. Regt. Nr. 75 with a yellow shoulder strap on the Dunkelblau.

I'll post the image over in the Photographs section to start a new discussion...if necessary. :cool:

Edited by IrishGunner
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Hi,

Can you suggest any books that have these Regiments mentioned?

Thanks

Chris

Chris,

check out Hartwig Busche's "Formationsgeschichte der Deutschen Infanterie im Ersten Weltkrieg (1914 bis 1918" published by Verlag für Preußische Historiographie, Owschlag, 1998. This also details the 600 series.

Regards

Glenn

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