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Medalcard Reading and decoding help


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I have some difficulties of a Royal Army Medical Corps guy regarding reading and decoding something on his medalcard

to me, it seems to be: SW.B. List TH/327

thought i'm totally uncertain what would it be.

As its also mentioned Dis.23.4.1916 i thought that he was discharged due to wounds and the SW.B. is a "silver wounded badge" - but here it ends ... as i only knew of a wounded badge in general, but not a certain grade.

Help is greatly appreciated and many thanks in advance!

Christian

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It's referring to the fact that he's also to be found in the Silver War Badge Rolls. The lists themselves compliment both the Medal Index Cards and Medal Roll Books, with this additional information i.e. unit discharged from; date of enlistment; date of discharge; SWB number; cause of discharge; age on discharge and whether or not he served overseas.

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Thanks a lot Graham for the very fast help!

The whole card looks like the following.

And as i'm quiet fascinated by the possibilities of researching british medals, i try it ones in a while, but stumble accross many stones ...

The mentioned list of the silver war badge isn't online, as the medalcards, or is it? So far i was only able to find lists to officers, but not to enlisted/ncos.

Thanks again Christian

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Quick glance at the card tells me a couple of interesting little bits. First his discharge date and SWB issuance tell me he was wounded as to be found unfit for duty and discharged. Second his date of entrance into theatre being Sept 1914 wound have qualified him for the 1914 star had he been deployed to France or Belgium however since he was deployed to 3 (egypt (later in the war 3 meant Russia)) he only qualified for the 1914-15 star. His pension records may be available on ancestry.

Cheers

Chris

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Chris - unfortunately the issue of a *Silver War Badge doesn't necessarily imply one has been wounded as they were also issued to those discharged through sickness and also to men who had never served overseas.

*Often & inacuratley described as a "Silver Wound Badge".

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Chris - unfortunately the issue of a *Silver War Badge doesn't necessarily imply one has been wounded as they were also issued to those discharged through sickness and also to men who had never served overseas.

*Often & inacuratley described as a "Silver Wound Badge".

Very true, the only way to know if he was wounded or discharged due to illness will be his service file/pension record.

Cheers

Chris

Edited by censlenov
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Very true, the only way to know if he was wounded or discharged due to illness will be his service file/pension record.

Cheers

Chris

Hi Chris - the Silver War Badge Rolls here in the UK also contain the same information even down to the actual cause of illness. Where men have been discharged for various reasons, who also have not served overseas the end column on the right just has the "No" written in. I'm currently working my way through hundreds os pages of SWB's for the Northumberland Fusiliers and would reproduce a copy here, but they're probably to large to illustrate.

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Interesting news!!!!

But as i'm quiet new to it, i still have some questions ...

- Michael, how is it possible to tell by theater and entry date the unit, he served in? and where is it possible to research that?

- Graham, if you can illustrate your researchmaterial at least particialy, i would be very happy to see it, that i'm able to know how it looks like, as well, where you got that from and how?

Thanks a lot in advance and for the already answered questions Christian

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The National Archive MIC site is useful, but you have to remember that this is only part of the process. Neither the Medal Roll Books or Silver War Badge Rolls are on line and have to be viewed in person. The purpose of the MIC was to direct you to the relevant pages of either book in which you would find the recipient listed.

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Thanks Graham for the pictures and the impression i now was able to get.

Regarding the statement from Michael, which sources you used for the following statement (definately nothing to put it in question, just to educate myself a little bit more)

"His theatre and date of entry tells me that he was 42nd East Lancashire Division, which means he was 1st, 2nd, or 3rd East Lancashire Field Ambulance. He was probably a Gallipoli casualty, given his discharge date."

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