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Fuß-Artillerie-Regiment von Linger (Ostpreußisches) Nr.1


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This is a brief history and other data about the Fuß-Artillerie-Regiment von Linger (Ostpreußisches) Nr.1. I have started this long-term project as part of my quest to build a collection representing all the Imperial German field and foot artillery regiments.

For this regiment I have a Commemorative Medal; a regimental commemorative celebrating 50 years of the Fuß-Artillerie-Regiment von Linger (Ostpreußisches) Nr.1, 1864-1914. I bought this almost three years ago; unfortunately, I can't post a scan - the medal is in a safe deposit box a few thousand miles away. Maybe another day.

Critiques and comments welcome. Even better if you can add something to the story.

I don't intend to plagiarize as all of the information has been found on the internet; I lack any written references to the regiment (and am not sure a regimental history or Ehrenbuch even exists).

Websites that have yielded information on Fuß-Artillerie-Regiment von Linger (Ostpreußisches) Nr.1 follow:

http://www.festeboyen.pl/

http://www.1914-18.info/

http://www.axishistory.com/

http://www.firstworldwar.com/

http://www.polegli.tgcp.pl/

http://www.generalstafflibrary.com/

Edited by IrishGunner
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Fuß-Artillerie-Regiment von Linger (Ostpreußisches) Nr.1; Fuß-AR 1

Garrison:Königsberg i. Preussen

Established: 16.6.1864

Armee Korps: I. Armee Korps; Prussian 2. Fuß-Artillerie Brigade

Uniform: Collar/cuffs - Black Brandenburg w/ Blue Vertical Panel; White shoulder straps with a red 1; Pickelhaube wappen - Gilt 1st Pattern Grenadier Eagle.

This Commemorative Medal was likely issued on the Regiment's anniversary, 16 June 1914, only a short time before being mobilized. It was probably a very exciting time to be in the Regiment, celebrating 50 years of service to the Kaiser and preparing to defend the Fatherland against the growing storm.

Prior to mobilization, Fuß-AR 1 was subordinate to the I. Armee Korps and the Prussian 2. Fuß-Artillerie Brigade. The Regimental Staff, I. Battalion, along with the 5. and 6. Batteries of II. Battalion were garrisoned at Königsberg in East Prussia (present day Kaliningrad, Russian Federation). The II. Battalion Staff, along with its 7. and 8. Batteries manned the Festung Boyen at Lötzen (present day Giżycko in northeastern Poland).

Edited by IrishGunner
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On 17 August 1914, I.Batl./Fußart.Regt.1 (Schwere Feldhaubitzen) and Munitions Kolumn Abteilung/I. Battalion, were mobilized as part of I. Armee Korps. At the same time, I. Armee Korps came under the command of 8. Armee on the Eastern Front. I. Battalion, Fuß-AR 1, with its heavy field howitzers, would have moved from its garrison at Königsberg upon mobilization, remaining on the Eastern Front with the I. Armee Korps. On 17 August instead of withdrawing from the Russian offensive as ordered, I. Armee Korps turned and won a victory over three Russian divisions at Stalluponen; I. Armee Korps then withdrew to Gumbinnen. On 19 August, the Russian Second Army continued into East Prussia south of the Masurian Lakes, and on 20 August, I. Armeekorps fought the Russians to a draw at the Battle of Gumbinnen. I. Battalion likely participated in these battles and the later German victory at Tannenberg, which was fought between 26-29 August with I. Armeekorps attacking the Russian left flank as one of the pincers surrounding the Russian Second Army.

Interestingly, artillery played a curious part in the preparations of I. Armee Korps for the battle at Tannenberg. Despite some success at Gumbinnen, the German commander withdrew his forces to positions east of the Masurian Lakes, near Tannenberg. As a result, Hindenburg and Ludendorff were given command of the Eastern Front; they were intent on not giving up anymore East Prussian territory and began setting a trap for the Russians, who continued to advance into the dangerous terrain of the Masurian Lakes. Hindenburg and Ludendorff repositioned their forces to take advantage of the restrictive terrain around the Masurian Lakes, sending the I. Armee Korps by train to form the right wing of the planned encirclement of the Russians. On 25 August, Ludendorff issued an order to the I. Armee Korps commander, General Francois, to initiate the attack on the Russian left wing at Usdau. However, Francois resisted the order, preferring to wait at least until 27 August when he expected all of his artillery to complete its rail movement and be in position to support the attack. Ludendorff repeated the order; this time Francois reluctantly agreed to begin the attack despite not having enough ammunition for his artillery. In the meantime, the Germans intercepted two unencrypted messages transmitted by the Russians. The messages revealed that the Russian First Army would not be in position to support the Russian Second Army, the objective the German encirclement. As a consequence, Hindenburg decided that Francios could wait for the arrival of sufficient artillery support before beginning his attack. Ludendorff, on the other hand, was intent to assert his command over Francois and insisted that the attack still begin as planned. However, Francois continued to delay until he was satisfied that his artillery support was in place, finally beginning his attack on the left flank of the Russian Second Army on 27 August. I. Armee Korps achieved overwhelming success; however, Francois had lost the confidence of Hindenburg and Ludendorff and was relieved of command a short time later. The I. Armeekorps continued the fight in the First Battle of the Masurian Lakes and was an instrumental part of 8. Armee's expelling the Russians from East Prussia. It is likely that the I. Battalion/Fuß-AR 1 contributed to all of the early victories of I. Armee Korps.

Edited by IrishGunner
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It appears that II. Batl./Fußart. Regt. 1 may have remained on fortress duty; the 5. and 6. Batteries may have remained in Königsberg, while the II. Battalion Staff with the 7. and 8. Batteries remained in Lötzen within Festung Boyen. Elements of the II. Battalion would have seen initial combat during the Russian siege of Festung Boyen. Finished in 1848, Festung Boyen was built to defend East Prussia against potential threats from northeastern Russia and the Baltic region. The fortress defense system was reinforced by the natural geography of the Masurian Lakes and rivers. As the Russians advanced into East Prussia, they had to maneuver through the Masurian Lake region and they had to deal with Festung Boyen. Russian troops began a siege of the fortress; however, the German commander, Oberst Busse refused to capitulate. After the Russian defeat at Tannenberg, the Russians lifted the siege and withdrew from the area.

After mobilization, it appears a third battalion was formed; III.Batl./Fußart.Regt.1 (2 Battr. 21Cm-Mörser). These batteries appear to have been numbered 5. and 6.; these are the same numbers of the units remaining behind in Königsberg. It is not clear if these batteries moved from Königsberg or were simply designated from newly mobilized batteries. The III Battalion was designated for 3. Armee on the Western Front and probably first deployed near the Meuse River in Belgium.

After Germany's defeat in WWI, traditions of the Fuß-Artillerie-Regiment von Linger (Ostpreußisches) Nr.1 were taken over by the Reichswehr 1. (Preußisches) Artillerie-Regiment, 5. Batterie.

Edited by IrishGunner
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Roll of Honor:

The following officers and soldiers have been identified as being part of Fuß-Artillerie-Regiment von Linger (Ostpreußisches) Nr.1.

Oberstleutnant Neumann; Regiments-Kommandeur (1914)

Oberstleutnant Richard; reported to have attended the Lehrgang für ältere Offiziere bei der Fußartillerie-Schießschule vom 20. November bis 18. Dezember 1904

Major Friese; reported to have attended the Lehrgang für ältere Offiziere bei der Fußartillerie-Schießschule vom 20. November bis 18. Dezember 1904

Leutnant d. Rsv Bering, Walter; KIA 1918-10-24; Burial Giżycko, Poland

Leutnant Ernest, Leop.; KIA 1914-11-2?; Burial Paprotki, Poland

Vizefeldwebel Albrecht, Gustav; KIA 1915-02-12; Burial Biała Piska; Poland

Obergefreiter Fiedler; KIA 1915-04-29; Burial Białaszewo, Poland

Kanonier Marquardt; KIA 1915-03-08; Burial Białaszewo, Poland

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Oh ye of little faith!

Hmm. The source I found online claims the shoulder straps are white with a red 1; at least on the 1914 blue waffenrock.

Did they change to these yellow types with the feldgrau uniforms? :unsure:

Edited by IrishGunner
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IG,

Your source is correct for the Dunkelblau uniform. With the first field gray uniforms the foot artillery shoulder straps were field gray with white piping and red unit numbers, with the exception of,

The Guard Foot Artillery Regiment, which had no number or deivce.

The experimental battery of the Foot Artillery Testing Commission, which had a red monogram (APK) with a bursting bomb (still white piped).

The Lehr Regiment of the Foot Artillery Shooting School, which had a red monogram (FAS) with a bursting bomb.

In September of 1915 with the introduction of the new uniforms, the foot artillery shoulder straps were changed to a yellow-gold color with crossed "Langgranaten" and unit number in red.

Chip

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IG,

Your source is correct for the Dunkelblau uniform. With the first field gray uniforms the foot artillery shoulder straps were field gray with white piping and red unit numbers, with the exception of,

The Guard Foot Artillery Regiment, which had no number or deivce.

The experimental battery of the Foot Artillery Testing Commission, which had a red monogram (APK) with a bursting bomb (still white piped).

The Lehr Regiment of the Foot Artillery Shooting School, which had a red monogram (FAS) with a bursting bomb.

In September of 1915 with the introduction of the new uniforms, the foot artillery shoulder straps were changed to a yellow-gold color with crossed "Langgranaten" and unit number in red.

Chip

Nice, thanks.

Can you recommend a written reference on uniforms?

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IG,

It depends if you want an on-line source or a book. Books are pretty pricey these days. A three volume set of Kraus (in German)now costs about $240.00 before shipping. On the net, the Kaiser's Bunker probably is best for Dunkelblau reference. Field gray reference is a bit more difficult to find. There are sites, but unless you know a bit of German (and just a bit will do) there isn't much for the English speaker. Of course, you can always ask questions here! I could show you just about anything you would like to see. :rolleyes:

Chip

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There are sites, but unless you know a bit of German (and just a bit will do) there isn't much for the English speaker.

Chip

Ahh, kein problem; Ich spreche Deutsch! :cheers:

And Polish and Slovenian! :ninja:

I'll take the web links now and put the book on my birthday wish list! :whistle:

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Excellent! In that case, you will first have to go to the website and register. Then I can send you a link to the pages.

http://feldgrau.pyta...letin/index.php

Chip

I did this once before (remember the PMs?); now it doesn't remember me (can't log back-in) and my AV software says its an unsafe site. :unsure:

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I did this once before (remember the PMs?); now it doesn't remember me (can't log back-in) and my AV software says its an unsafe site. :unsure:

I have been on this site for three years and have had no problems. I use AVG too. I think there may be some pop-ups or maybe not, but simple pop-up blocker could take care of that. The site has hundreds of members from all over Europe. Their Databank is where the strap charts are.

Chip

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A few new bits of info regarding Fuss-Artillerie Regt Nr. 1 ... adapted from http://www.lexikon-der-wehrmacht.de/

The following Wehrmacht generals started their military careers or served during WWI in Fuß-Artillerie-Regiment von Linger (Ostpreußisches) Nr.1.

Generalfeldmarschall Milch, Erhard; Erhard Milch entered Fuß-AR 1 as a Fahnenjunker on 24 February 1910. In autumn of the same year, he became a Fähnrich and received an appointment as a lieutenant on 18 August 1911 in the same regiment. He assumed duties as a battery officer; however, in the summer of 1915 he transferred to the Fliegenden Truppe and was assigned to Artillerie-Flieger-Abteilung 205. He subsequently served as Adjutant of the Artillerie-Fliegerschule Ost and several different flying units. During WW I he earned both the Iron Cross First and Second Classes. On 1 February 1939, Milch became the Generalinspekteur der Luftwaffe, a position he held until 1945..

Generalleutnant Usinger, Christian; Christian Usinger volunteered for military service on 1 August 1914 as a Kriegsfreiwilliger, joining Fuß-AR 1. He reached the rank of lieutenant in 1915 and served with the regiment throughout WWI. In the summer of 1939, he was given command of an artillery regiment. He held several higher level artillery commands during WWII and assumed command of the 223. Infantrie Division on 20 October 1942. He also commanded the 81. Infanterie-Division for a period in 1944. He ended the war in command of I. Armee Korps on the Eastern Front.

General der Artillerie Lucht, Walther; Walther Lucht joined Fuß-AR 1 as a Fahnenjunker on 27 June 1901; by October 1911 he had achieved the rank of Oberleutnant and served with the regiment's 8. Batterie in Lötzen. On 1 January 1913, he assumed the position of Regimental Adjutant; later that year, he assumed command of the Kriegsakademie in Berlin. With the beginning of WWI, he returned to the regiment as a battery commander. He received the Iron Cross Second Class on 4 November 1914; and later also the Iron Cross First Class. In 1916, he left the regiment and served on various headquarters staffs. At the end of WWI, he was serving on the staff of 75. Reserve-Division. Prior to the outbreak of WWII, he served as Artillery Commander for the Condor Legion in Spain, earning the Medalla de la Campaña de España, das Cruz de Guerra de España und das Spanienkreuz in Gold mit Schwertern. At the beginning of WWII, he commanded Artillerie-Regiment 215 and held several artillery commands early in the war. He assumed command of 87. Infantrie-Division on 17 February 1942, but only held that command for a short time before assuming command of 336. Infantrie-Divsion on 1 March 1942. He later commanded the LXVI. Reserve Korps, the LXVI Armee Korps, 15. Armee (during the Ardennes Offensive), 11. Armee, and the XII. Armee Korps.

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Rick;

In post # 5 you only identified a few officers of the regiment. Am I missing something, or do you have access to Prussian Ranglisten? The 1914 issue had the entire officer corps of the regiment as of May 6, 1914, their seniority, posts within the regiment, decorations, usw. I have about 30 or so Prussian Ranglisten for many dates from 1879 to the 1926 Ehrenrangliste covering 1914-1918, so let me know if you don't have access to this info. (Or did I just fly to an incorrect conclusion?)

Bob Lembke

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Hello,

here we have a certificate to another commander of the Fußartillerie-Regiment Nr. 1

His name was Martin Julius Gerhard Kadelbach!

Do you have some more informations about the regiment between March and July 1918???

There you have also a face of him :catjava:

Best wishes

Karsten

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Rick;

In post # 5 you only identified a few officers of the regiment. Am I missing something, or do you have access to Prussian Ranglisten? The 1914 issue had the entire officer corps of the regiment as of May 6, 1914, their seniority, posts within the regiment, decorations, usw. I have about 30 or so Prussian Ranglisten for many dates from 1879 to the 1926 Ehrenrangliste covering 1914-1918, so let me know if you don't have access to this info. (Or did I just fly to an incorrect conclusion?)

Bob Lembke

Bob, these officers were gleaned from the internet. I do not have any Ranglisten.

I am just starting these regimental histories; based upon what I can easily find. Certainly, there is more info out there; I am just not sure where I should draw the line. At some point in the future, I may start a website representing all regiments of the German Imperial artillery. I just am not sure what I would want each page to look like. At this point, I am just fascinated by whatever I can find...

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Hello,

here we have a certificate to another commander of the Fußartillerie-Regiment Nr. 1

His name was Martin Julius Gerhard Kadelbach!

Do you have some more informations about the regiment between March and July 1918???

There you have also a face of him :catjava:

Best wishes

Karsten

Karsten; thanks! These are great additions to the thread. I appreciate the photo and document. Hopefully, I will be able to add such items to my collection.

Unfortunately, I do not have more info on the regiment. I am searching out info on other regiments and am always on the look-out for more history and will keep you in mind for this period. Maybe I will one day be able to snag a regimental history.

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Rick;

Are you just interested in 1n May 1914 or also other years? The regt is probably on one page. How can I get it to you? I think I sent you my e-mail.

Bob

(Can't erase the below stuff from my PDA.)

Bob, these officers were gleaned from the internet. I do not have any Ranglisten.

I am just starting these regimental histories; based upon what I can easily find. Certainly, there is more info out there; I am just not sure where I should draw the line. At some point in the future, I may start a website representing all regiments of the German Imperial artillery. I just am not sure what I would want each page to look like. At this point, I am just fascinated by whatever I can find...

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  • 8 months later...

My college room mates Grandfather was Max Susat of Zenftenberg (South of Berlin) who was an NCO in Artillerie von Linger until 1916 - as a machinist he was sent back to Germany to supervise POW labor just before his battery was over-run on the Western front. The Grandson has Susat's Soldbuch and several photos from the war as well as letters. I've asked him to post the photos on facebook - and will get permission to post them here

Kirk D. Lyons

It appears that II. Batl./Fußart. Regt. 1 may have remained on fortress duty; the 5. and 6. Batteries may have remained in Königsberg, while the II. Battalion Staff with the 7. and 8. Batteries remained in Lötzen within Festung Boyen. Elements of the II. Battalion would have seen initial combat during the Russian siege of Festung Boyen. Finished in 1848, Festung Boyen was built to defend East Prussia against potential threats from northeastern Russia and the Baltic region. The fortress defense system was reinforced by the natural geography of the Masurian Lakes and rivers. As the Russians advanced into East Prussia, they had to maneuver through the Masurian Lake region and they had to deal with Festung Boyen. Russian troops began a siege of the fortress; however, the German commander, Oberst Busse refused to capitulate. After the Russian defeat at Tannenberg, the Russians lifted the siege and withdrew from the area.

After mobilization, it appears a third battalion was formed; III.Batl./Fußart.Regt.1 (2 Battr. 21Cm-Mörser). These batteries appear to have been numbered 5. and 6.; these are the same numbers of the units remaining behind in Königsberg. It is not clear if these batteries moved from Königsberg or were simply designated from newly mobilized batteries. The III Battalion was designated for 3. Armee on the Western Front and probably first deployed near the Meuse River in Belgium.

After Germany's defeat in WWI, traditions of the Fuß-Artillerie-Regiment von Linger (Ostpreußisches) Nr.1 were taken over by the Reichswehr 1. (Preußisches) Artillerie-Regiment, 5. Batterie.

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