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Field Telepnone "L"


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Hello Everyone,

Here's another offering from my limited collection of field communications equipment. In this case it is the Telephone type "L" as used in WWII and for some time afterwards. I can't find much information regarding these other than they were used during WWII by the allies, this one being Canadian, but for how long afterwards I do not know. Perhaps some of the members can assist me with that information?

These operated through wires connected back to a receiver. There is a crank on the side to "ring up: the other end and the phone runs on two "D" batteries.

Regards

Brian

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This view is with the case lid open. The rectangular section between the mouth piece and the ear piece of the hand set is where the two "D" sized batteries are inserted. The wires in the area, to the right of the hand set, where the wire would meet the lid as it closes is a place where a lot of damage to the handset wires occurred.

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A quick web search shows a reference on the REME museum page:

Telephone Set L (YA 3717) Vol U03, EMER No U739, Dated 1955-Jul

So, at least until 1955 - through the Korean War - and probably well into the 1960's.

The US Army used its WWII version field telephone, the EE-8, well into the Vietnam War. It's replacement, the TA-312, was first used in the Korean War and has been used well into the current century.

I suspect that the British version had a similar history.

Edited by IrishGunner
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A quick web search shows a reference on the REME museum page:

Telephone Set L (YA 3717) Vol U03, EMER No U739, Dated 1955-Jul

So, at least until 1955 - through the Korean War - and probably well into the 1960's.

The US Army used its WWII version field telephone, the EE-8, well into the Vietnam War. It's replacement, the TA-312, was first used in the Korean War and has been used well into the current century.

I suspect that the British version had a similar history.

Many thanks IrishGunner.

I suspected they were used during the Korean War but was not sure.

Regards

Brian

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