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Valore Militare 1859


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Since many nice pictures of al Valore Militare medals for the Italian 2nd War of Independence (1859) circulate on the forum, I thought it would be interesting to add this one: it is an unusual engraving, with "Armata d'Italia 1859" instead of the usual "Guerre d'Italie 1859". I have the recipient's history from French archives, a very interesting career, I must say; the medal has been in my collection for more than 20 years and comes from a reputed dealer; type is F.G., engraving is correct, identical to many other 1859 specimens of my collection and I have no reason to doubt about its originality.

This engraving confirms what was said on the forum, i. e. that no attributions (and thus, engravings) were made in Torino where the medal was struck, but it was rather left to French regiments to decide on the attributions, and engrave the medal. In this respect, I have an interesting document of that period, providing the guidelines of engraving. If interested, I can scan it and put it on the forum. It would be interesting to create a set of specimens, for appreciating different engraving styles. I know of at least four different styles.

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OUTSTANDING!!!!!!!!!! :cheers::jumping: :jumping:

What a SPLENDID European medal! Do I read that right-an offcier aspirant type -what does it mean?

I would LOVE to see the documents!

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OUTSTANDING!!!!!!!!!! :cheers::jumping: :jumping:

What a SPLENDID European medal! Do I read that right-an offcier aspirant type -what does it mean?

I would LOVE to see the documents!

The engraving is to an Officier d'Administration Comptable, an Accountant Officer. Seldom seen, at least I have never seen any other similar. I will post the details I have about the engraving rules, very interesting. Or did you mean the guy's history?

Meanwhile, find attached another nice 1859 Valore Militare medal, different engraving style. Also have his history.Enjoy.

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Here is another nice specimen, also a 2nd War of Independence (1859) award, but of the Sardinian type, i.e. Guerra contro l'Impero d'Austria (impressed) model, engraved to an Italian bersagliere. Engraved, it is much scarcer than the Guerre d'Italie model to Frenchmen.

Paolo Sézanne, and other sources, quote the following figures: 2471 silver medals to Italians (thus, the impressed Guerra contro l'Impero d'Austria type), 8000 to the French Government for concession to French troops.

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  • 4 months later...

Since many nice pictures of al Valore Militare medals for the Italian 2nd War of Independence (1859) circulate on the forum, I thought it would be interesting to add this one: it is an unusual engraving, with "Armata d'Italia 1859" instead of the usual "Guerre d'Italie 1859". I have the recipient's history from French archives, a very interesting career, I must say; the medal has been in my collection for more than 20 years and comes from a reputed dealer; type is F.G., engraving is correct, identical to many other 1859 specimens of my collection and I have no reason to doubt about its originality.

This engraving confirms what was said on the forum, i. e. that no attributions (and thus, engravings) were made in Torino where the medal was struck, but it was rather left to French regiments to decide on the attributions, and engrave the medal. In this respect, I have an interesting document of that period, providing the guidelines of engraving. If interested, I can scan it and put it on the forum. It would be interesting to create a set of specimens, for appreciating different engraving styles. I know of at least four different styles.

Hi Alvalmil

If not too much trouble I'd be fascinated to see your document on guidelines of engraving. I have noticed several styles of engraving all in capital letters. Some are large well executed in style scratching just slightly below the surface & some the letters are engraved more deeply. I noticed the 1859 War AVM's given to the Italians can be in CAPITAL letters or in SCRIPT. Were both styles engraved by the regiments or were some done privately? I don't know if the Italians received a blank reverse and it was up to the recipients themselves to have a dedication on the reverse. On some you will find two or three words & others filling the whole reverse with a short description of their act of bravery. I see lots of early AVM's with no inscription & then on others one notices all sorts of wonderful examples of calligraphy reason why I'm thinking it was up to the soldiers to decide in placing an inscription or not. I see collecting these can be complex but certainly rewarding. Does one have to worry about fakes? As a beginner it would be more prudent to focus on one period. Thanks for posting scans, your examples are super.

Sincerely

Yankee

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  • 9 years later...

Hello, 

The French state mint, didn't produce the Sardinian/Italian "Al Valore Militare" medal. 

It is known, that French, private firms, produced this medal to provide those eligible to wear it, in more or less fine quality and different diameter. 

The French-made medals, usually have the "Guerre d'Italie" inscription, struck instead being engraved. 

Best wishes, 

E. L. 

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Many thanks for your reply Elmer. This is the medal I have its dia is 31mm and has 2 makers or silver proof marks on ring and one on the rim of the medal. It's a lovely old medal but sadly not named. Your reply has been most helpful . Cheers Gerry

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