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I love the awards from the Napoleonic Wars, but I have never seen them mounted on any medal bars. When I come across them, they are usually sans-ribbon, or just strung upon a replacement ribbon. If anyone has any medal bars from that era, I would love to see some photos of them!

Thanks a bunch! rolleyes.gif

Jason

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Here's a nice Guelphic Medal pair. Newly mounted but exceptional nonetheless.

A Guelphic Medal pair awarded to Corporal Charles Heine, 1st Troop, King’s German Artillery, for gallantry at Waterloo.

GUELPHIC MEDAL FOR BRAVERY 1815 (Carl. [Hei]ne, Oberfeuerwerker, 1...atterie); HANNOVERIAN MEDAL FOR VOLUNTEERS OF THE K.G.L. 1814.

Condition: the first with contact marks hence Good Fine

Corporal Charles Heine, 1 Troop, Kingʼs German Artillery, was awarded the Guelphic Medal in the 1820 List:

ʻAt Waterloo, before coming into action, this Battery remained for a long time in the second line, and thereby suffered many losses through enemy artillery fire. When at last they advanced up to the first line, from which some batteries were going back through lack of ammunition, they came under a murderous fire from artillery and sharpshooters, but on their side they contributed substantially, so that the last powerful attack by the French was thrown back.

Bombardiers Heine and Niemeyer were very soon the only gun detachment commanders remaining fit for action; they attended to the proper laying of several guns with commendable zeal, hurrying from one gun to another. Likewise the personnel of the Battery were concentrated; on Niemeyerʼs gun five gunners were dead or wounded.

At a critical moment, when enemy columns nearby threatened a fresh attack, lack of ammunition, especially of case-shot, became a worry. Heine with two gunners quickly went to search a number of abandoned and shot-up limbers and wagons under heavy fire. Fortunately his voluntary search was attended by great success; he found the required ammunition, brought it up and it was used against an immediately following attack by the French Guards.ʼ (Ref Von Wissel p146)

Charles Heine enlisted on 18 February 1809 and served in Northern Germany 1813-14. He was promoted Corporal shortly after the battle of Waterloo, on 1 August 1815. On the disbandment of the Legion he transferred to the 1st Troop, Hannoverian Horse Artillery and was pensioned on 31 July 1827. He was still living in 1856 but did not claim a Military General Service Medal.

Edited by azyeoman
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A beautiful Guelphic Medal and Waterloo pair to a man in the King's German Legion.

A very good Guelphic Medal pair awarded to Corporal William Decke, 1st Hussars, King’s German Legion, for bravery at Coimbra where he and two comrades had been cut off following a French charge - they then distinguished themselves by boldly cutting through the French lines to safety, all three wounded while doing so.

GUELPHIC MEDAL FOR BRAVERY 1815 (Wilhelm Decke) fitted with contemporary replacement silver suspension in the form of an entwined serpent; WATERLOO 1815 (Corp. William Decke, 1st Reg. Hussars K.G.L.) fitted with original steel clip and ring suspension Very Fine

Awarded the Guelphic Medal in the 1819 List:

“On the 1st of October 1810, the squadron to which Decke belonged, was on picquet near Coimbra, and was attacked many times by the French, at a defile, which the squadron had to pass, and in order to clear which, the hussars were obliged frequently to charge superior numbers of the enemyʼs cavalry. Decke distinguished himself on this occasion by great bravery and presence of mind. In one charge he and three other hussars were entirely cut off. He did not therefore give himself up for lost, but, together with two of his comrades, boldly cut his way through; one of the hussars was killed, and Decke and the two others were both wounded” (Ref Beamish p506).

Also entitled to the M.G.S. medal, 5 clasps, Talavera, Busaco, Fuentes DʼOnor, Ciudad Rodrigo, Salamanca.

Edited by azyeoman
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Hanover; Guelphen Military Merit Medal (CHRISTIAN SCHWARTZE CORPORAL im JNFAN ______ LLE); and Great Britain: Waterloo Medal (CHRISTIAN SCHWARTZE, 4th LINE BATT. K.G.L.). Naming is officially impressed. Naming is partially obscured on both, better than fair. Accompanied by documentation from the National Archives confirming Schwartze on the Nominal List and on the Pay List, as having fought at the Battle of Waterloo with the 4th Line Battalion and assorted research papers. Footnote: Christian Schwartze enlisted as a Private with the 4th Battalion, King's German Legion on December 12, 1805. His military history includes stops at Verden, Clooney Barracks, Tullamore, Blagdam, Zeeland; Messina, Gisso, Contessa, Augusta, Syracuse and Gauzien (Sicily); St. Vincente, St. Culgat, Valls and Esplugas (Spain); Oudres, Deal, Mons, Bois de Boulogne and Neuilly (France); and Barnstorff (Hanover). He was with the 4th Line Battalion and awarded the Guelphen Military Merit Medal for participation and being wounded three times at the Battle of Ordal, September 13, 1813. As noted by von Wissel: "Schutze Christian Schwartze, 4th Line Battalion, was leading his mortally wounded Lieutenant Graffe out of the battle at Ordal to the rear and went directly back to his unit, although already wounded himself. Shortly after, he received two more wounds which left him on the ground. Again, at Waterloo, he distinguished himself." Schwartze was only one of fifteen men to receive the Guelphen Military Merit Medal with the 4th Line Battalion.

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I am speechless! WOW! To own a medal pair that includes a bravery medal for the repulse of Napoleon's Guard. WOW!

you have made my week. any chance you will let me post this on the Waterloo Facebook page? Paul Dawson would die.

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Where didn't he fight?!!! The KGL was famous in the British army for having high standards, especially its cavalry which was far more disciplined than its British counterparts (at Waterloo the British cavalry charged too far and was decimated, leaving mostly KGL cavalry left). All in all this soldier must have been extremely brave!

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I am speechless! WOW! To own a medal pair that includes a bravery medal for the repulse of Napoleon's Guard. WOW!

you have made my week. any chance you will let me post this on the Waterloo Facebook page? Paul Dawson would die.

Be my guest. It's not my pair. How I wish it were, but alas too steep for me; but I can appreciate them. : )

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An Extremely Rare Olmützer Militärmedaille 1796 - Extremely Rare Olmützer Militärmedaille 1796 - Napoleonic Pair of Awards, mounted as originally worn, on original, slightly tattered ribbons; Army Cross 1813-14, green lacquer mostly worn off;Olmützer Militärmedaille 1796, in silver gilt, 44mm; medals in slightly worn condition. Footnote: Olmützer Militärmedaille was awarded by the City of Olmütz (Olomouc) in 1796 to 10 bravest volunteers-troopers who served during campaigns against French Troops. According to Václav Mericka in his monumental work “Orden und Ehrenzeichen der Österreichisch-Ungarischen Monarchie”, only 10-12 medals were produced, and only 10 awarded, making this one of the rarest Napoleonic Campaign medals.

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Napoleonic Wars Hanoverian Pair: The Waterloo Medal is silver and impressed "HUSAR FRIEDRICH KNIGGE, HUS. RGT. BREMEN KT VERDEN". The War Merit Medal 1813 was struck in bronze. Nice pair with original ribbons.

Edited by azyeoman
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