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What do you know about Bavarian MVK's and MVO's


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  • 2 weeks later...

Here's a rare bird. The Military Merit Cross of The Military Merit Order. As awarded to "other ranks" between 1866 and 1905. Note the lack of flames between the arms! Silver, enamel and gold center schiffers. Stunning. Rare. Probably under 500 awarded... ever. Note the correct "statute ribbon" as proscribed prior to 1913 and the institution of the "War Ribbon". Swords were awarded to these after the fact and the recipient had to purchase them himself!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Weiss & Co made Orders were CAST (yes, CAST) and finished with dappled flames and icky visible file marks on the edges of the arms.

This particular piece is a weird numismatic "mule" as will be made even more apparent by the reverse. It is entirely in frosted and polished silver without any gilt at all. I only know of two others like this one, so wonder if it was actually made after 1918 as a late award.

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In place of the CORRECT enamelled reverse "hubcap" as shown in Don's example above, this Weiss mutation is entirely frosted silver. It is NOT an incorrect repair using the reverse of a MMC2-- this is the same real silver frosted and polished as the rest of this bizarre Weiss-made piece.

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Hi Rick, nice to see you here. Nice post. Those awards run the spread of qualitity control. It is a shame how quality and I think respect for awards suffered as the war dragged on. You see it in the TR stuff too. And we won't even bring up '57 stuff, eeeewwwww.

Don

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A superb little cross, in real silver, with real gold centers. Last one actually awarded ~ca. 1901 for China. Swords were an "after the fact" authorization and the recipient had to go out and private purchase his swords, if he desired. After 1905, the design was officially changed to the commonly seen non-enameled versions for "other ranks".

These included:

Third Class, in copper plate

Second Class, in silver plate

First Class, in gold plate

Awarded for "military merit" on the statute ribbon as shown above between 1905 and 1913. This version is difficult to find (no swords). A crown suspension indicated subsequent award/higher degree of the same class.

From 1913 on, with the advent of WW2, military bravery awards were signified by the addition of (official) swords on the suspension fillagre. Again, crowns were utilized to show a higher degree/subsequent award of the same class. The statutes stated that only one class could be worn. Bavaria was somewhat of a stickler regarding this.... they required a return of the prior award before they would release the subsequent one! I believe RR actually has one of these "demand" documents in his collection.

Despite these rules, during the "anything goes" 1920's... bars can be found with 2 versions of the same class mounted. I would advise caution when presented with this as it seems there's quite a few bad ones floating about.

Cheers!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Don, The BMVO4, which was made in silver/enamel was awarded to junior Officer ranks, Leutnant and Hauptmann. The BMVO3 was for higher ranks and was gilded silver/enamel. I am sure Rich Research will be able to provide the exact amounts of these Officer grade awards. All I can say is, Im more than happy to own this beauty.

Edited by Mike Huxley
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