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A very impressive piece to say the least, and thank you for showing it in such detail. Does the ribbon change from 3rd to 2nd class? I thought the white with blue strips was a peace time ribbon only?

chuck 

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I think the ribbon is for non combat but not certain 

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It is probably a silver-gilt piece. However, the cross body is mounted the wrong way round. 
The lower widened edge of the cross arm must be on the back. Viele Grüße

 

Edited by waldo

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Thanks but I don’t understand

 

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I'll try it again. 
For gilded medallions or MVOs, the edge of the lower cross arm is widened on the back. 
As a result, it was immediately obvious that the 4th class of the MVO is not a real gold 
medallion or the 3rd class gold plated MVOs. In this example, the widening of the lower 
cross arm on the front can be seen. This should be correct on the back. As an example, 
I want to show the back of a MVO 4th class with silvered medallions from 1917 onwards. 
Here you can clearly see the broadening of the lower cross arm. Depending on the manufacturer, 
this is sometimes less pronounced. 
Left of the MVO with silver-gilt medallions from 1917 until the end of the war, 
on the right the MVO with three-part real gold medallions until the end of 1916.
 .

 

 

 

7MVO 4 mit Schw. Weiss .jpg

Edited by waldo

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Here is an example from eMedals. Note that the wider edge  of the lower cross arm is on the reverse, as waldo says it should be. On yours, the jeweler must have accidentally flipped the cross when he mounted the swords and center medallions.

GST9840003.jpg.38adce0e3c7614db3d75290e1746ebfb.jpgGST9840004.jpg.ac3f0b64974d7c88103171266daf80db.jpg

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Hello, I can not imagine that this MVO was delivered to Weiss so. 
It may be that he was later repaired and assembled incorrectly.

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I agree with waldo.
Weiss was court jeweler of the Bavarian king. He had a name to lose if he had delivered such faulty goods.

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Good morning to all

As proof this photo, not always the medals were correctly mounted.

see Sachsen, Albrechtsorden, Großkreuz mit Schwertern

Gemeral d.Art. a.D. Nehbel

 

NEHBEL 0100003 BR.jpg

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just recieved from the family today, no box, just the blue wrapping paper. I think this may be a 1914-15 award, or it belongs to a different family member.....mvk1.thumb.jpg.abb1ea77c981137910fe77c7fdfcde12.jpgmvk2.thumb.jpg.801c741d49269e6cbfdb9254462f7ae9.jpg

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Very nice. This is a late production of Hemmerle (1918) with silver guilt medaillon. I have never seen blue paper.
Normally this cross was  in a red paperbox. The first class was awarded to the rank Feldwebel-Leutnant.

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Hello Chris, the MVKs and MVOs were invariably handed out in cases. Reason for that was the return obligation.
Thus, the MVOs and MVks were always stored safely and were rarely returned damaged. The blue bag
would have to come from an EK or from an honor cross for front fighters

The only option I see in a private purchase. Since the original would have been returned 
in the case after death and the privately procured piece could have been in a bag. 

Best regards 
Walter

.

ekf 002.JPG

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Hi Walter,

I guess that is possible, there have been 100 years for the family to mix things up in the box.

It was probably in the packet to protect it from scratches.

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I am totally useless at this :-( ... I have spent at least half an hour with the makers variation article in the BDOS magazine and have no idea.... Any thoughts?me1.thumb.jpg.6f5846fb0673cf7baa7a1f579d081584.jpgme2.thumb.jpg.867a4d78856455cec25f0087a93edf7b.jpg :-(

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Very nice and rare Picture.
A MVK second or first class without swords.

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