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This fellow has offered me this badge and I am interested, but have no clue on the reality of the piece. Is this a legit Mongolian Badge for anti partisan. The book while very intriguing, doesn't seem to really conform to what I would expect for an award document per se. Any and all opinions are welcome and the guidance greatly appreciated.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewI...AMEDW%3AIT&rd=1

Thanks much guys!

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Looks fine to me not easy to find these anymore

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I'm not sure we yet know enough about Mongolian badges that early to be sure about much. While the "orders" may have been made in the Soviet Union, where were the lesser badges made? I'm not sure we know. If legitimate, the pair seems pretty rare. All (all) you'd need is someone to translate the Mongolian!

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I know a couple of historians who do Mongolian history, and I'm sure they can read it. Not a large stable of these folk exist; kind of like the population count of those who can read Manchu. I doubt there are many in Ulanbaatar who could handle it, after all these decades of Cyrillic.

Should any of you get the document, or one like it, I can ask around.

Although, should all else fail: http://www.linguamongolia.co.uk/

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Oh yeah.... can anyone who has the current Mongolian Book that came out recently take a peek and see if there's anything in there that matches this? Thanks!! Rick

Yep, it is there, p. 80, under army badges, as C 05, "Partizan, 1921". No details, and Battushig admits the badge sections are less than perfect (but it is something!). He has talked about doing a badge update online.

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And, by the way, rather than being "anti partisan" (that sounds really Nazi), I'd guess this would be for the partisans who fought in Sukhbaatar's 400-man strong partisan army that captured Khigat from the Chinese on 18 March 1921 (a day that would become Mongolian Army Day and a highly symbolic moment in the early history of the nation). This came to be seen as THE turning-point in establishing Mongolian independence from China.

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hmmmm, same pin but very different back image. Hmmmmm.

The one Dr. B. shows looks like it was made from recycled oil cans. The e$cam one is much better quality. Too good? Until we know more (chronology, for example), who knows, . . . ??

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That is true.

The obverses look identical. There could have been some foreign material that got into the press and that caused those marks on the revese of Dr. B's badge.

We need to look at another badge to see a 3rd reverse.

Rusty.

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Hi guys,

The badge is indeed the Partisan badge, and not anti-partisan.

The one in Dr B's book is a unique piece with this special "recycled" metal reverse.

There are 3 variations, screwback numbered, screwback not numbered and pinback numbered.

The numbering style is correct for this badge.

The doc is also good, although there is no way to tell this specific badge goes with this specific doc, since the badge's number in not written in the book. So it could be put together, or it might be good, you'll never know. :(

The doc is an early emmission, because the date is written in Uighur rather than in cyrillic, as is the case in later docs. I have several, I'll post pix later

I have one exemple where the number of the badge was added in handwriting under the picture, but it is definitely not an official entry.

These badges were issued in the early forties.

The badges usually sell for +- 100 US, and the booklet for +- 50 US, now the prices have skyrocketed lately, and this is an early doc, possibly with matching badge, so it could be very expensive.

Hope this helps

Jan

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Vatjan! Much thanks for the assist on this one. The price is not out of line with what you suggest so I will take the plunge. My first! Upon receipt, I will post detailed scans of everything for everyone to study. I'd like to say thanks again to everyone who helped me out here!

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Please do post pics, the badge is in a really good condition and that is fairly rare.

In the meantime take a look at one of my docs, notice the added number under the portrait.

I do admit it looks more official than I remembered, but still not 100% because then the number would be mentionned on the text page somewhere.

Jan

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I borrowed the pic from the seller, I hope he doesn't mind. :blush:

It is for educational purposes, so I hope that's fine.

Anyway, you can clearly compare the older Uighur date on this one, and the Cyrillic date on the doc in the previous post.

On this one you can also see Choibalsan's signature on the right hand page.

Jan

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