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Robin Lumsden

A Flintlock

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I have always wanted just one nice, clean example of a flintlock pistol, so this is the one I have plumped for.

Here's the seller's description................

Flintlock Pistol by Wilkinson, c. 1810. Officer’s private purchase 14 bore holster pistol, in the general form of the New Land Pattern. James Wilkinson & Sons of London were gunsmiths to King George III and had a Royal Warrant for supplying military weapons to the Board of Ordnance. They were often instructed to make pistols privately. This example was probably manufactured for use in the Peninsular War and has quality features including a stepped lock inscribed ‘Wilkinson’, a waterproof pan, a roller frizzen and an excellent re-browned barrel. All brass work is in very good condition, as is the one piece walnut stock, with the only fault being an old repaired minor crack to the left side of the stock, near the muzzle. Captive swivel rammer and unusual flat sided grip. Overall very fine condition.

It's eye candy to me.

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Any comments from those of you who know more about flintlocks than I do (that will be ALL of you !!!) will be welcome. :cheers:

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You've chosen an excellent example for your collection, Robin.

They don't get much, if any, better than this.

Well done and thanks for posting it.

Regards

Brian

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Thanks Brian.

Your comments are very welcome. :cheers:

I've ordered a copy of this old book so that I can learn about what I've just bought. It's usually the other way round. :whistle:

Edited by Robin Lumsden

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Robin - you couldn't have a better example to start a collection. Early Wilkinson's are always sought after and you can see the fine workmanship in the grip carving. Obviously, it has had some restoration, but at 200 years old that is to be expected. There would have been a pair originally. Good heavy bore that would stop most things at close range .

For display, I always think a pistol looks good with a contemporary powder flask and ball dispenser - a good militaria antiques shop should be able to help. I have thought for some time that old firearms are undervalued - the boxed sets have gone up from hundreds to now, thousands of pounds for good examples - however, in my view, singles are still moderate and a good field for collectors. Mervyn

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beautiful! The worksmanship on these is just fantastic. Each flintlock I have held is its own original piece, it is amazing the craftmanship that went into them.

That is a heck of a way to start a collection!! :cheers:

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Mervyn and Chris.

Thanks to you both.

Your comments are much appreciated.

This is a new field for me............probably my one and only flintlock, so it's nice to know that it's a decent one. The price was pretty good, too.

I'll display it on one of these stands..............

Edited by Robin Lumsden

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Robin - I like the plastic display stand - would you have an address for the suppliers ?

One final word on the pistol - and I'm sure you know this - being only single shot, they were intended after firing to be held by the barrel and the butt became a bludgeon. They would often - if in close quarters - throw them at the enemy. The bottom picture on your book - I showed the percussion version on this forum a little while ago. Mervyn

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Robin - I like the plastic display stand - would you have an address for the suppliers ?

Here you go, Mervyn...........

http://www.just-in-case.biz/

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I'll try to trace the original owner from the serial number, here................

http://www.armsresearch.co.uk/Wilkinson%20Firearms/Wilkinson%20Firearms.html

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Robin - looks very elegant on the table. I like the look of this room - your alcove with the German officers' items is nicely under-stated. Please do a top of the box on the table - looks to be an interesting mix of wood and stone ?

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A superb piece Robin. Bravo.

An object of art!

Does this perhaps mean you are drifting towards Napoleonics?

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Robin - looks very elegant on the table. I like the look of this room - your alcove with the German officers' items is nicely under-stated. Please do a top of the box on the table - looks to be an interesting mix of wood and stone ?

The box is a 'Mein Kampf' SS box, Mervyn...........

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A superb piece Robin. Bravo.

An object of art!

Does this perhaps mean you are drifting towards Napoleonics?

Better view............

No Napoleonics. Only histrionics. :cheers:

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Thankyou for showing the other views - the pistol fits in beautifully. I asked about the box - which is nicely made. Would it have been a presentation gift with the book inside ? With your turret you could defend the front door with the pistol.....

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Thankyou for showing the other views - the pistol fits in beautifully. I asked about the box - which is nicely made. Would it have been a presentation gift with the book inside ? With your turret you could defend the front door with the pistol.....

Hello Mervyn.

The box is generally known as a 'Mein Kampf' box because it is believed that it was used at SS wedding ceremonies to contain the copy of MK which was given to every married couple. The runic symbols on the box and its size all point to this use. The box would have been retained by the SS unit for use time and time again at these ceremonies............the couple did not take the box away.

Other collectors have their own theories about these boxes, though.

There has been no hard documentary evidence on their use, to date.

They are rare.............around 40 or so are known to exist worldwide.

Needless to say, they have been faked, but the copies pale into insignificance when compared with the real ones.

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Here's a better picture of the lid, Mervyn.

The Hagall-rune was regarded as the most powerful of the runes (all the others derived from it) and it often appeared on wedding accoutrements.

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