Jump to content

The comprehensive book on the orders and medals of Mongolia


Recommended Posts

This book is the product of years of research work based on the Mongolian archival sources. The book includes the information on the orders and medals of the Mongolian People's Republic (MPR) from 1924 to 1992. The text is in English. The dimensions of the book: 29 cm x 21 cm. 272 pages, paperback.

Unlike any previous publications on the Mongolian awards, the book has detailed information on award regulations, order and medal descriptions, the quantities of the orders and medals produced at the Soviet and Mongolian mints and the serial numbers and the dates of production of almost all types of Mongolian orders and medals. The serial numbers of some orders and medals awarded, the dates of the awarding and the posts and names of the some recipients of the Mongolian orders and medals are listed in the book.

Over 290 high resolution close-up color photos of obverse and reverse of the Mongolian medals, orders, ribbons and award documents are illustrated in this book. It contains the highest quality color images of the Mongolian orders and medals available anywhere today. For the first time, the illustrations of the rare awards (e.g. the Medal for Valor of Mongolia, the Badge of the Hero of the MPR, the Gold Star Medal of the Honorary Freeman of the MPR, the Marshal's Stars, etc) and the illustration of the bras ribbon for the Gold Star Medal of the MPR are provided in this book. The The book also contains some 60 black-and-white and color photos of the recipients wearing their decorations.

Edited by Tsend
Link to post
Share on other sites

An attempt was made to classify the orders and medals of the MPR into types, variations and sub-variations. The awarding periods for an each type or variation of the order or medal is also provided. The serial numbers for a specific type or variation of the order or medal produced in the Soviet Union or in Mongolia are stated based on the archival documents. However, the author also included the lowest and the highest serial numbers for a specific type or variation of the order and medal observed to date for validating the archival information.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The illustrations of the specimens with the lowest serial numbers ever observed for the Badge of the Hero of MPR, the Gold Star medal of Hero of MPR, the Order of Sukhbaatar, the Order of the Red Banner of Combat Valor (1945 type), the Order of the Red Banner of Labor Valor (1945 type), the Order of Combat Valor, the Order of the Polar Star (1936 type),the Medal for the Selflessness, etc. are presented in the book. Also, the illustrations of the Identification Booklet for the Badge of the Hero of the MPRP (1941 type) awarded to Marshal Kh. Choibalsan, award document number 1 for the first Order of the Red Banner of Combat Valor (1926 type) awarded to N. Jadamba (not Choibalsan!), Order Booklet for the first Orders of Sukhbaatar awarded to Kh. Choiblasan, Award card with serial number 1 for the Medal for Victory over Japan awarded to Kh. Choiblasan, Award certificate with serial number 1 for the Medal of Glory of Virgin Land Cultivators awarded to Yu. Tsedenbal, Award certificate with serial number 5 for the Medal for Selflessness awarded to D. Chuluunkhuu and many other award documents are illustrated in this book.

There is a comprehensive chapter dealing with the award documents and the brass and cloth ribbons for the Mongolian orders and medals. The book presents the illustrations and descriptions of all the types of the Identification Booklets for the Hero and the Hero of Labor of the Mongolian People's Republic along with the early award documents of the first Mongolian orders and medals. The annex also has a brief chapter on the fakes and copies of the Mongolian orders and medals.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

Just to add some examples of the kind of archival documents I have used to produce this book. The scan below is the copy of the delivery package list and the product (in this case, The Medal of the 40th anniversary of the People's Revolution) quality certificate issued by the Moscow Mint to the Presidium of the People's Great Khural on March 8, 1961 for the Medals of the 40th anniversary of the People's Revolution with serial number 00001-04000.

If translation is needed, I can provide it later.

post-6190-074807700 1292151734_thumb.jpg

post-6190-018086400 1292151801_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Below is the a copy of the Soviet invoice document for the production and delivery of the orders (ORBCV, ORBLV and OPS) to the Council of Ministers of the Mongolian People's Republic in 1946. Most interestingly, the invoice gives some numbers of the Order of the Red Banner of Combat Valor of the first, second, third and fourth awardings produced by the Soviet Mint.

post-6190-010072300 1292151983_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished with my first multi-hour reading (and viewing) session of this book - many more to follow I'm sure.

To start with the summary: this is an OUTSTANDING piece of work. I can highly recommend it to all with an interest in Mongolian awards as well as those with an interest in Soviet awards:

- wonderful pictures (both of awards, documents and recipients)

- immense amount of detail on award regulations, types/variations, awardees, serial numbers, manufacturing sources, etc.

- LOTS of interesting facts

I will have to take another weekend along with my "vault" of awards at home to walk through the book in detail and write down all my comments, questions (e.g. why was Dandar's hero title revoked?), and come back to GMIC for discussion.

Highly recommended!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

I would like to share some information on some of the documented orders and medals illustrated in my book. One of the most fascinating and story-telling awards of the MPR are the Medals for Selflessness. The Medal for Selflessness (Шудрага журам медаль in Mongolian) stands for the phrase "Just order". The archival research and memoirs of the people who initiated this medal indicate that the idea of instituting this medal was taken from a Soviet Medal for Distinguished Medal in Protecting the Public Order. One of the initiators of this award was Chief of the Ulaanbaatar capital Police Department B. Lhachin who proposed this medal be instituted as a Medal to award the police officers. The first proposed name read "Medal for Protecting the Public Order". However, the Chairman of the Presidium of State Great Khural J. Sambuu suggested to shorten the name of the medal and broaden the scope of the award criteria (to include: the feats in saving human life during the natural and man-made disasters, saving the lives of drowning people, preventing the crime, maintaining the public order, etc). Since the institution of the Medal for Selflessness in 1959, more than 1500 Mongolians and foreigners have been decorated with this medal for the personal valor and diligence displayed when saving the human lives and protecting the state/private property.

Below is the photo scan of the Colonel B. Lhachin who initiated this honorable award.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to share some information on some of the documented orders and medals illustrated in my book. One of the most fascinating and story-telling awards of the MPR are the Medals for Selflessness. The Medal for Selflessness (Шудрага журам медаль in Mongolian) stands for the phrase "Just order". The archival research and memoirs of the people who initiated this medal indicate that the idea of instituting this medal was taken from a Soviet Medal for Distinguished Medal in Protecting the Public Order. One of the initiators of this award was Chief of the Ulaanbaatar capital Police Department B. Lhachin who proposed this medal be instituted as a Medal to award the police officers. The first proposed name read "Medal for Protecting the Public Order". However, the Chairman of the Presidium of State Great Khural J. Sambuu suggested to shorten the name of the medal and broaden the scope of the award criteria (to include: the feats in saving human life during the natural and man-made disasters, saving the lives of drowning people, preventing the crime, maintaining the public order, etc). Since the institution of the Medal for Selflessness in 1959, more than 1500 Mongolians and foreigners have been decorated with this medal for the personal valor and diligence displayed when saving the human lives and protecting the state/private property.

Below is the photo scan of the Colonel B. Lhachin who initiated this honorable award.

The document for the Medal for Selflessness illustrated in this book (page #176) belongs to Mr. Nyam Batmunkh. He was awarded the Type 2 Medal for Selflessness on March 13, 1973 by the Decree of the Presidium of the People's Great Khural #62. At the time of awarding, Mr. Batmunkh was a private of the Mongolian People's Army. Private Batmunkh was awarded the Type 2 , Variation 1 (unnumbered) Medal for Selflessness along with the two other military servicemen.

Below is the scan of his Medal Certificate, the medal front and back.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The document for the Medal for Selflessness illustrated in this book (page #176) belongs to Mr. Nyam Batmunkh. He was awarded the Type 2 Medal for Selflessness on March 13, 1973 by the Decree of the Presidium of the People's Great Khural #62. At the time of awarding, Mr. Batmunkh was a private of the Mongolian People's Army. Private Batmunkh was awarded the Type 2 , Variation 1 (unnumbered) Medal for Selflessness along with the two other military servicemen.

Below is the scan of his Medal Certificate, the medal front and back.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Below is the copy of the Decree of the Presidium of the People's Great Khural of the MPR that awarded N. Batmunkh with the Medal for Selflessness.

Translation:

The Decree of the Presidium of the People's Great Khural

of the Mongolian People's Republic

March 13, 1973. # 62. Ulaanbaatar.

On awarding some individuals with the Medal for Selflessness

The Presidium of the People's Great Khural of the Mongolian People's Republic decrees hereby to award the following officers and privates of the Mongolian People's Army who honorably fulfilled their civil duty, displayed exceptional courage and actively participated in the efforts to extinguish the fires that affected the territories of Bulgan and Selenge provinces during spring of 1972, thus making an invaluable contribution in protecting the natural resources and in saving the livestock and state property.

1. Togooch Batsuuri Senior private of 3rd company of 1st battalion of 1st Motorized rifle brigade

2. Batsukh Manaldgva Lieutenant, Commander of 3rd company of 1st battalion of 1st Motorized rifle brigade

3. Nyam Batmunkh Private of Anti-aircraft unit of 1st Motorized rifle brigade

Chairman of the Presidium of the People's Great Khural

of the Mongolian People's Republic

First Deputy Chairman of the Presidium of the People's Great Khural

of the Mongolian People's Republic S. Luvsan

Deputy Chairman of the Presidium of the People's Great Khural

of the Mongolian People's Republic Ts. Dugersuren

Secretary of the Presidium of the People's Great Khural

of the Mongolian People's Republic Ts. Gotov

Edited by Tsend
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

This book is the product of years of research work based on the Mongolian archival sources. The book includes the information on the orders and medals of the Mongolian People's Republic (MPR) from 1924 to 1992. The text is in English. The dimensions of the book: 29 cm x 21 cm. 272 pages, paperback.

Unlike any previous publications on the Mongolian awards, the book has detailed information on award regulations, order and medal descriptions, the quantities of the orders and medals produced at the Soviet and Mongolian mints and the serial numbers and the dates of production of almost all types of Mongolian orders and medals. The serial numbers of some orders and medals awarded, the dates of the awarding and the posts and names of the some recipients of the Mongolian orders and medals are listed in the book.

Over 290 high resolution close-up color photos of obverse and reverse of the Mongolian medals, orders, ribbons and award documents are illustrated in this book. It contains the highest quality color images of the Mongolian orders and medals available anywhere today. For the first time, the illustrations of the rare awards (e.g. the Medal for Valor of Mongolia, the Badge of the Hero of the MPR, the Gold Star Medal of the Honorary Freeman of the MPR, the Marshal's Stars, etc) and the illustration of the bras ribbon for the Gold Star Medal of the MPR are provided in this book. The The book also contains some 60 black-and-white and color photos of the recipients wearing their decorations.

:rolleyes:

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

I should really pick one of these up one of these days......Sorry Tsend I lost your email address a while back......damn computers.I lost all our emails regarding the screwplates etc. too, so I haven't been in touch. Life is getting in the way of collecting, I hear children will do that to ya..lol

Jay

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Blog Comments

    • I've never smoked a single cigarette in my 62 years so I can't compare, but I can say that I like Lapsang Souchong tea, having tasted it the first time when I was 16, and a sea cadet. I'm not a Brit, though.
    • Lapsang Souchong, when i first tasted this I thought it was like stale cigarette ends...it's an acquired taste for sure.  
    • I like my tea strong enough for my spoon to stand up in. My father got me into it. When my father was at RAF Dum Dum 1943-47 most of his fellow officers drank ice cold drinks to mitigate  the heat, his Sikh batman warned him against it and said that strong hot tea would cool him down, most certainly did. So years later in the UK when everybody else was drinking iced drinks on a baking day the wood family was inbibing copious quantities of hot strong brews of Assam's finest. P
    • Hi ccj, Thanks for your comments. Funny how, for me at least, coffee has become a habit more than a conscience choice. It's the old, "Well if you having one (coffee) pour me as well". When I get together with my son-in-law, a former Brit, it's tea all the way. Thanks again. Regards Brian  
    • I live and grew up in the south (USA) and the drink of choice 7 days a week was cold sweet tea. I was unaware Lipton was British because that’s what most southern use for brewing tea. When I joined the army I learned most people in the north and western parts of the USA drank unsweetened tea and that was perplexing to my young brain. Now days I can’t stand sweet iced tea but it’s still the most common drink in the south, but, you can get unsweetened ice tea in the south. Im familiar with ho
×
×
  • Create New...