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Korean War Turkish Troops outfit and badges


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Thanks Brett, I do my best to add new things but it is getting very expensive and hard to find. Hi Peter, I don't have any knowledge about the uniforms that was worn then but after Turkey joined NA

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dfdenizyaran shared a photo above in this forum. (Posted 02 August 2012 - 18:22)

That photo gives a good idea about the uniforms of the 1st Turkish Brigade, before leaving for Korea at Etimesgut in Ankara.

From left: Col. Celal Dora -Comm. 241.nd Regiment, Dep. Comm. Natik Poyrazoglu, Captain Abbas Yurdakul, adjutant Capt. Halim Irsoy, 5th Captain ?, Regiment Legal Adv. Capt. Munir Araslı, Captain Muzaffer Sebukcebe and First Lieutenant Seref Unuvar

And here is the Standard of the 241st Infantry Regiment that landed on Pusan Korea in 1950.

Edited by demir
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From my collection;

img3378resize.jpg

North Star, Turkish Flag and US 25th Infantry Division arm patches. US Korean Service Medal, UN Korea Medal ribbons.

img3389resize.jpg

Fifth Turkish Brigade , Republic's 31st Anniversay, 1923-1954

I'm very interested to see the Chinese / Japanese characters on the packages for the Fifth Turkish Brigade badges (Post # 44). Do you know where these badges were made?

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I'm very interested to see the Chinese / Japanese characters on the packages for the Fifth Turkish Brigade badges (Post # 44). Do you know where these badges were made?

According to forum member "fukuoka":

"It is Japanese. It says 'badge.' Nothing specific."

So these are made in Japan. They are very high in quality.

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I'm very interested to see the Chinese / Japanese characters on the packages for the Fifth Turkish Brigade badges (Post # 44). Do you know where these badges were made?

Hi,

A Korean friend of mine translated it as "badge" as dfdenizyaran says. My friend says it is Chinese but used in China,Japan and Korea.

I think it must have been made in Japan considering the fact of production potential among others in 1954. The silk Turkish Flag patches were also from Japan.

Regards

Demir

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From my collection;

img3378resize.jpg

North Star, Turkish Flag and US 25th Infantry Division arm patches. US Korean Service Medal, UN Korea Medal ribbons.

img3389resize.jpg

Fifth Turkish Brigade , Republic's 31st Anniversay, 1923-1954

Hi dfdenizyaran,
thank you for sharing. Could you explain why there are stars near crescent? Could you explain their meaning?
Best regards,
Aurora
Edited by Aurora
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Hi dfdenizyaran,
thank you for sharing. Could you explain why there are stars near crescent? Could you explain their meaning?
Best regards,
Aurora

Hello,

The code name for the Turkish Brigade was North Star.

The North Star is the last star on the Little Bear constellation.

The small stars close to the crescent with the big star, refers to this constellation, with the big star refering to the North Star.

The crescent and the big star refers to the Turkish Flag.

Hope I could choose the words clearly.

Demirhan.

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  • 5 months later...

NORTH STAR (Kutup Yildizi or Simal Yildizi in Turkish) of the Turkish Brigade and Turkish Brigade Badge for the Turkish troops.

IMO te Turkish Badge is for the 5th and followind Brigades. Earlier ones do not have "Turkey" writen on the flag.

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I do agree, older "Crescent & Star" badges did not have the "TURKEY" on top.

I think there was a time that there were two seperate badges for the right shoulder, "Crescent & Star" and "Turkey".

Wonderful finds!

Edited by dfdenizyaran
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Hi dfdenizyaran,
thank you for sharing. Could you explain why there are stars near crescent? Could you explain their meaning?
Best regards,
Aurora

------------------------

They are represening the stars of the insignia of the Turkish Brigade which is North Star. I will share a new picture of the North Star below.

Demir

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  • 1 month later...

Hello,

The latest addition to my Korean War collection is explained through the words of the seller:

" KOREA 5. TURK TUG. YILBASI HATIRASI". (Korea 5th Turkish Brigade New Year Memento)

“Unused presentation plaque from the "Turkish Brigade" in Korea. The plaque consists of a 4 3/8" dia. enamel and brass emblem mounted on a 11.5" x 8.5" x 1/2" wooden backing together with a blank engraveable 3 3/4" x 3/4" metal plate. As shown in the third photo the plaque has folding wooden stand in back so that it can be stood or hung by the string.

The emblem consists of a map of North and South Korea in yellow on a light blue backgroud. The cities of Kunuri and Pusan are also located. Kunuri was the site of the Turks toughest battle and where they lost the most men. There is a Turkish soldier holding a globe and laurel wreath (symbol of the United Nations) with 1955 thereon. There is the muslim cresent and star in white as per the Turkish flag. the inscription around the bottom reads, " KOREA 5. TURK TUG. YILBASI HATIRASI". (Korea 5th Turkish Brigade New Year Memento - d)

The wood back has what appears to be some plugged holes showing the wood was probably recycled. The engravable metal plate is tarnished and needs to be polished. The plaque was obtained from my father-in-law who was the U.S. Turkish Liaison Detatchment Commander in Korea from Oct '54 - Feb '55.”

Regards

Demir

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  • 1 year later...

Last two additions to my Korean War collection: NORTH STAR

US General Walker announced that General McArthur gave the title "North Star" to 1st Turkish Brigade. A Turkish soldier designed this symbol which was accepted by General Tahsin Yazici. From that time on all Tukish soldiers carried this badge on their uniforms. – Tosun Saral
source: The Magazine "Yillarboyu Tarih" (History Along the Years) February 1983 Nr:2 p.6o

Edited by demir
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