Jump to content

Korean War Turkish Troops outfit and badges


demir
 Share

Recommended Posts

dfdenizyaran shared a photo above in this forum. (Posted 02 August 2012 - 18:22)

That photo gives a good idea about the uniforms of the 1st Turkish Brigade, before leaving for Korea at Etimesgut in Ankara.

From left: Col. Celal Dora -Comm. 241.nd Regiment, Dep. Comm. Natik Poyrazoglu, Captain Abbas Yurdakul, adjutant Capt. Halim Irsoy, 5th Captain ?, Regiment Legal Adv. Capt. Munir Araslı, Captain Muzaffer Sebukcebe and First Lieutenant Seref Unuvar

And here is the Standard of the 241st Infantry Regiment that landed on Pusan Korea in 1950.

Edited by demir
Link to comment
Share on other sites

From my collection;

img3378resize.jpg

North Star, Turkish Flag and US 25th Infantry Division arm patches. US Korean Service Medal, UN Korea Medal ribbons.

img3389resize.jpg

Fifth Turkish Brigade , Republic's 31st Anniversay, 1923-1954

I'm very interested to see the Chinese / Japanese characters on the packages for the Fifth Turkish Brigade badges (Post # 44). Do you know where these badges were made?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm very interested to see the Chinese / Japanese characters on the packages for the Fifth Turkish Brigade badges (Post # 44). Do you know where these badges were made?

According to forum member "fukuoka":

"It is Japanese. It says 'badge.' Nothing specific."

So these are made in Japan. They are very high in quality.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm very interested to see the Chinese / Japanese characters on the packages for the Fifth Turkish Brigade badges (Post # 44). Do you know where these badges were made?

Hi,

A Korean friend of mine translated it as "badge" as dfdenizyaran says. My friend says it is Chinese but used in China,Japan and Korea.

I think it must have been made in Japan considering the fact of production potential among others in 1954. The silk Turkish Flag patches were also from Japan.

Regards

Demir

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From my collection;

img3378resize.jpg

North Star, Turkish Flag and US 25th Infantry Division arm patches. US Korean Service Medal, UN Korea Medal ribbons.

img3389resize.jpg

Fifth Turkish Brigade , Republic's 31st Anniversay, 1923-1954

Hi dfdenizyaran,
thank you for sharing. Could you explain why there are stars near crescent? Could you explain their meaning?
Best regards,
Aurora
Edited by Aurora
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi dfdenizyaran,
thank you for sharing. Could you explain why there are stars near crescent? Could you explain their meaning?
Best regards,
Aurora

Hello,

The code name for the Turkish Brigade was North Star.

The North Star is the last star on the Little Bear constellation.

The small stars close to the crescent with the big star, refers to this constellation, with the big star refering to the North Star.

The crescent and the big star refers to the Turkish Flag.

Hope I could choose the words clearly.

Demirhan.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

NORTH STAR (Kutup Yildizi or Simal Yildizi in Turkish) of the Turkish Brigade and Turkish Brigade Badge for the Turkish troops.

IMO te Turkish Badge is for the 5th and followind Brigades. Earlier ones do not have "Turkey" writen on the flag.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do agree, older "Crescent & Star" badges did not have the "TURKEY" on top.

I think there was a time that there were two seperate badges for the right shoulder, "Crescent & Star" and "Turkey".

Wonderful finds!

Edited by dfdenizyaran
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Hi dfdenizyaran,
thank you for sharing. Could you explain why there are stars near crescent? Could you explain their meaning?
Best regards,
Aurora

------------------------

They are represening the stars of the insignia of the Turkish Brigade which is North Star. I will share a new picture of the North Star below.

Demir

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Hello,

The latest addition to my Korean War collection is explained through the words of the seller:

" KOREA 5. TURK TUG. YILBASI HATIRASI". (Korea 5th Turkish Brigade New Year Memento)

“Unused presentation plaque from the "Turkish Brigade" in Korea. The plaque consists of a 4 3/8" dia. enamel and brass emblem mounted on a 11.5" x 8.5" x 1/2" wooden backing together with a blank engraveable 3 3/4" x 3/4" metal plate. As shown in the third photo the plaque has folding wooden stand in back so that it can be stood or hung by the string.

The emblem consists of a map of North and South Korea in yellow on a light blue backgroud. The cities of Kunuri and Pusan are also located. Kunuri was the site of the Turks toughest battle and where they lost the most men. There is a Turkish soldier holding a globe and laurel wreath (symbol of the United Nations) with 1955 thereon. There is the muslim cresent and star in white as per the Turkish flag. the inscription around the bottom reads, " KOREA 5. TURK TUG. YILBASI HATIRASI". (Korea 5th Turkish Brigade New Year Memento - d)

The wood back has what appears to be some plugged holes showing the wood was probably recycled. The engravable metal plate is tarnished and needs to be polished. The plaque was obtained from my father-in-law who was the U.S. Turkish Liaison Detatchment Commander in Korea from Oct '54 - Feb '55.”

Regards

Demir

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Last two additions to my Korean War collection: NORTH STAR

US General Walker announced that General McArthur gave the title "North Star" to 1st Turkish Brigade. A Turkish soldier designed this symbol which was accepted by General Tahsin Yazici. From that time on all Tukish soldiers carried this badge on their uniforms. – Tosun Saral
source: The Magazine "Yillarboyu Tarih" (History Along the Years) February 1983 Nr:2 p.6o

Edited by demir
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...
  • 3 months later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share


  • Blog Comments

    • Two years down the line.   My mother-in-law passed away this summer, as did one of her sisters-in-law.   My exhibition opened, and we had a marvellous speakers' night with four Peacekeeping veterans, including a Meritorious Service Medal winner.  But Covid closed it down in March 2020, and while still there it hasn't reopened.
    • Sounds great other than the Orange & Mango squash only because I prefer cran-pomegranate juice.
    • "(...) disgusting herbal concoction (...)" I took note of this description, to enrich my otherwise limited, English "Wortschatz"...
    • At work the standard indian tea such as PG tips is referred to as chimp tea. This goes back to the days when we had a Spanish girl working for us whose command of the English language was extremely limited. One lunch she said she was going to the shop could she get anything. I asked if she could get a pack of tea bags. She returned with some disgusting herbal concoction. I tried to explain what was required but without success. I then remembered PG tips had a picture of a chimpanzee on the packe
    • When I read Lapsang Souchong i decided to post something about these Tea . Many years ago I dont  know about Lapsang until I read James Michener book Centennial and the description of the savour of the Lapasang as a mix of tar and salt & smoked made me proof . It was exact ! and i liked it since then .
×
×
  • Create New...