Jump to content

Recommended Posts

It's a high-wing design, so I would agree that the French Potez is the most likely candidate.

Notice to the right, there appears to be a skeleton of another plane, perhaps another Potez? If it were an airframe, is it possible that this picture came from a captured French airfield?

Capstone

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 8 months later...
  • 10 months later...

Hello,

Can anyone tel me if this aeroplane is a Lancaster or not?

I've always wanted a pic of a Lancaster with its crew only this crew will have to do for the time being.

Tony

Tony, I am absolutely certain that this aircraft is NOT, repeat NOT, a Lancaster, Halifax, Wellington, Beaufort, or Liberator (although I briefly thought it may be last named by shape of coskpit, and nose turret placement compared to location of cockpit), but the slab-sided box-section fuselage and strange "windows" a little further back make me think that this is something considerably older from a European manufacturer - perhaps French. The Bloch, Amiot and Potez companies produced some mighty ugly looking bombers prewar, usually high winged and two or four engines mounted alongside fuselage, the 4-engined type having pusher/puller engines mounted back to back so to speak. However my choice would have to be the Potez 540 of 1933 (entered service 1934), very slab-sided, high wing monoplane, nose turret, conventional tail surfaces, two Hispano Suiza V-12 engines driving 3-bladed metal propellers mounted low alongside fuselage. The main undercarriage units retracted into the lower regions of the engine nacelles, which appear to be attached to the fuselage by stub wings, or possibly struts. The wing is strut braced by large parallel lift stuts (as in Catalian flying boats), and there is a mid-upper turret which would make it quite an advanced aircraft for its day. It also has rear fuselage windows apparently identical in design to the aircraft in your photograph. Also important is fact that this type was still in ervice with the Armee de l'Air in 1939/40. What do you think? (Find a photo by googling) Some (49) were also delivered to the Spanish Air Force in 1936, and according to my information ("The Bomber Aircraft Pocketbook" by Roy Cross, published 1964, pages 84/85) over 210 were delivered to the French Air Force, and "the last remnants were still in use in North Africa for transport duties in 1943".

David D

Link to post
Share on other sites

Tony, I am absolutely certain that this aircraft is NOT, repeat NOT, a Lancaster, Halifax, Wellington, Beaufort, or Liberator (although I briefly thought it may be last named by shape of coskpit, and nose turret placement compared to location of cockpit), but the slab-sided box-section fuselage and strange "windows" a little further back make me think that this is something considerably older from a European manufacturer - perhaps French. The Bloch, Amiot and Potez companies produced some mighty ugly looking bombers prewar, usually high winged and two or four engines mounted alongside fuselage, the 4-engined type having pusher/puller engines mounted back to back so to speak. However my choice would have to be the Potez 540 of 1933 (entered service 1934), very slab-sided, high wing monoplane, nose turret, conventional tail surfaces, two Hispano Suiza V-12 engines driving 3-bladed metal propellers mounted low alongside fuselage. The main undercarriage units retracted into the lower regions of the engine nacelles, which appear to be attached to the fuselage by stub wings, or possibly struts. The wing is strut braced by large parallel lift stuts (as in Catalian flying boats), and there is a mid-upper turret which would make it quite an advanced aircraft for its day. It also has rear fuselage windows apparently identical in design to the aircraft in your photograph. Also important is fact that this type was still in ervice with the Armee de l'Air in 1939/40. What do you think? (Find a photo by googling) Some (49) were also delivered to the Spanish Air Force in 1936, and according to my information ("The Bomber Aircraft Pocketbook" by Roy Cross, published 1964, pages 84/85) over 210 were delivered to the French Air Force, and "the last remnants were still in use in North Africa for transport duties in 1943".

David D

David,

I wish they had always written what they had photographed on the back of their photos, including names, ranks and units of any soldiers in the background, where the photo was taken & exact date.

Thanks for your reply and welcome to the forum.

Tony

Edited by Tony
Link to post
Share on other sites

David,

I wish they had always written what they had photographed on the back of their photos, including names, ranks and units of any soldiers in the background, where the photo was taken & exact date.

Thanks for your reply and welcome to the forum.

Tony

Tony,

Glad I could be of assistance. Actually you may have noticed that I was so busy looking up my reference books that I did not even notice there was a "Part 2" to your thread, which included fact that the other readers were on to it too! Still, I got there in the end, and it was only a matter of time - they even had an excellent picture of it already on the thread. A great hunt!

David D from New Zealand

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
  • 3 years later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Blog Comments

    • Sounds great other than the Orange & Mango squash only because I prefer cran-pomegranate juice.
    • "(...) disgusting herbal concoction (...)" I took note of this description, to enrich my otherwise limited, English "Wortschatz"...
    • At work the standard indian tea such as PG tips is referred to as chimp tea. This goes back to the days when we had a Spanish girl working for us whose command of the English language was extremely limited. One lunch she said she was going to the shop could she get anything. I asked if she could get a pack of tea bags. She returned with some disgusting herbal concoction. I tried to explain what was required but without success. I then remembered PG tips had a picture of a chimpanzee on the packe
    • When I read Lapsang Souchong i decided to post something about these Tea . Many years ago I dont  know about Lapsang until I read James Michener book Centennial and the description of the savour of the Lapasang as a mix of tar and salt & smoked made me proof . It was exact ! and i liked it since then .
    • I have been known to drink Lapsang Souchong and Tea, Earl Grey, Hot... both "without pollutants". I normally have one mug of coffee in the morning, then spend the rest of the day drinking Orange & Mango squash (by the pint). Then evening comes and it's a pint, followed by red wine with dinner and sometimes a drop of Laphroaig afterwards.
×
×
  • Create New...