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I've always liked the look of the Red Cross pins.

Can you guys post a few more, and give us (me) a little education?? I've noticed in other threads that there were several different types and some in different colors as well. Am I remembering correctly?

Are there any good references out there for Red Cross items??

Thanks.

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Hi Jim,

The DRK is another of my interest areas, there isn't a lot out there reference wise. Angolia's work "In the Service of the Reich" is the only real work that covers the organisation as a whole. However, if like me, you are into their enamel badges, JR Cone's booklet "One People, One Reich; Enameled Organizational Badges of Germany 1918 - 1945" is the best work available & covers these very well.

The above two badges are firstly the DRK Honour Pin, given for meritorious service that was not quite within the scope to earn the medal. It is available in both pinback & stickpin forms. In use between 1939 - 1945.

The other badges are the Senior Helper's badge (known as the type 3 pattern), which was for nursing helpers that had proven themselves over a period of time. The helpers in this sense were not nursing staff as such, but somewhere in between a licensed nurse & a nurses aid.

I'll post some more DRK badges as time permits.

Cheers

Don

Edited by scowen
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Thanks for posting the Volunteer's or Samariterinnen badge & the DRK medal John. I won't get into the medal for Jim here as it will get too complicated.....

This badge was for private citizens & indeviduals who were not members of the DRK gave time & assistance to patients & anyone who required help. They had to have put in a minimum of 100 hours before this badge was issued......

Cheers

Don

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  • 5 months later...

Hi Rosenberg,

I'm sorry but I'm not really sure what it is you want to know.

As I mentioned before, they were given to helpers who had shown over a period of time that they were competent in their tasks. It can also be found in a painted or lacquered form probably from later in the war when enamel was more expensive or in short supply.

Cheers

Don

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Thanks,Don! I am sorry for having put my question that way.There are two types of the senior helpers badge in this thread,you are refering to one as the third pattern,so my initial question should have been whether the pattern is in regard to three types of the same badge or in regard to three different qualifying levels(..helper,senior helper)?

Cheers

Edited by Rosenberg
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Ah, I see, I'm sorry.

Perhaps I should have said that it is sometimes referred to as a "Helpers badge Type III".

In his book "One People, One Reich", JR Cone refers to the group of Helpers badges using the distiction Type I, Type II etc. I do not yet have either Type I or II as I haven't found any in the condition I like.

Type I is similar to the badge in post number 9 above, except that it also has the word "Helferin" around the edge. It also has a horizontal enamel bar either side so that it looks more like a clip or broach.

Type II looks similar to John's Samariterin badge in post 10. Again, the word "Helferin" takes the place of Samariterin, & there is a Swastika either side of the word.

Hope this clarifies my error a little blush.gif .

Cheers

Don

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