Jump to content
Mervyn Mitton

USE US - OR, LOSE US.........

Recommended Posts

This was the motto on Bounemouth busses when they were short of customers. We haven't had a post on this section since December - does anyone have anything of interest ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mervyn,

I have some time off and am trying desperately to learn computer skills. I have a few bits and bobs from other countries that I am attempting to get posted but Im afraid I am a bit of a luddite.

There is also the problem that doing the job we do we don't really like to broadcast the fact but be assured we are friends here. I personally would love to see more American patches etc ( might get some trades going ) and I would love to see some French Gendarmie stuff.

Come on folks lets get posting

Craig

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Militcia were the Romanian Police but came under the Military Establishment.

Kevin in Deva. :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I get a mo I will post a medal or two related to the Militcia.

Kevin in Deva. :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I acquired his award of the Sacred Treasure he received from the Emperor of Japan while he was the police commissioner of metropolitan London. Earlier, he was the Police Inspector in Ceylon.

Dick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mervyn,

I haven't seen any new posts from you on the POLICE OF THE WORLD threads ,with the caps you were getting in.

Are you still waiting for more caps or are the ones you showed all you got ?

Look forward to seeing more soon.

Best Regards,

Les

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the reminder Les. I have quite a few more here that I haven't posted - also there are more at the flat in Bournemouth. I must get them sent over. I keep going onto new projects - am trying to write a history for the only Canadian tipstaff - do an article with illustrations for 'Death of the Prince Imperial' - and have just bought a 1900 book on senior officers of the Boer War - all in their full dress uniforms. I am going to start posting this on Brit.& Commonwealth Military History this afternoon. I think the truth is that us 'oldies' think we can do more then we really can ! How are you at present ?

I am glad that members have agreed that we shouldn't let this Foreign Police section disappear. We did ask Nick to make it available.

Dick - Sir John Waldron was Commissioner when I joined. Nice old boy - but, I don't remember him being very effective. His Deputy was a man called Starr - he used to make un-announced inspection visits on Police stations and was a very 'rough' piece of work. Everyone was terrified of him. I remember on one visit he made me walk him around my 'Beat' - at that time right in the heart of the East End. I was very polite to him !

Kev - nice old pair of handcuffs - are they Romanian made ? The shape of the aperture is slightly different to the US and UK patterns. Thanks for posting them - now, don't forget the medals..........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the reminder Les. I have quite a few more here that I haven't posted - also there are more at the flat in Bournemouth. I must get them sent over. I keep going onto new projects - am trying to write a history for the only Canadian tipstaff - do an article with illustrations for 'Death of the Prince Imperial' - and have just bought a 1900 book on senior officers of the Boer War - all in their full dress uniforms. I am going to start posting this on Brit.& Commonwealth Military History this afternoon. I think the truth is that us 'oldies' think we can do more then we really can ! How are you at present ?

I am glad that members have agreed that we shouldn't let this Foreign Police section disappear. We did ask Nick to make it available.

Dick - Sir John Waldron was Commissioner when I joined. Nice old boy - but, I don't remember him being very effective. His Deputy was a man called Starr - he used to make un-announced inspection visits on Police stations and was a very 'rough' piece of work. Everyone was terrified of him. I remember on one visit he made me walk him around my 'Beat' - at that time right in the heart of the East End. I was very polite to him !

Kev - nice old pair of handcuffs - are they Romanian made ? The shape of the aperture is slightly different to the US and UK patterns. Thanks for posting them - now, don't forget the medals..........

Good morning Mervyn,

Thanks for that great piece of history. I agree that he must have retired in obscurity as not too much information was openly available. I do know that he served in Ceylon during WWII. But what a shame to let your personal awards turn up at auction houses.

Dick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mervyn,

You East End boys always get the visits from Royalty!

I can't remember the last time a Commisioner came Sarf of the River then again they aren't stupid!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Mervyn,

Yes ,time just flies by nowadays, like yourself I have of loads of projects to get on with but don't have enought time in the day to get any of them completed.

Healthwise I'm doing O.K. at the moment, wasn't too good over Christmas which Is why I wasn't surfing the site, just getting back to look now I'm feeling better.

Maybe this year I'll work out how to post pictures :)

Look forward to seeing what other caps you have and of course commenting on them:)

And for

Foofighter,

what French Gendarmerie stuff are you looking to see ? Do you have a specific interest ?

Best Regards.

Les

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Blog Comments

    • Brian, Thanks for initiating this discussion. For me, it’s a combination of the thrill of the chase, the history behind the item, and the aesthetics, although this latter factor may seem a bit strange to some. To illustrate this, the very first thing I collected as a kid in the 1950’s was a Belgian WW1 medal, for service in 1914-18, which is bell shaped, with a very striking profile of a very dignified soldier, wearing an Adrian helmet which bears a laurel wreath. It was the image that
    • Thank you for sharing your story, it was most interesting and greatly appreciated, it makes this blog well worth the time to post. Regards Brian  
    • Hello I started collecting when I found my first Mauser cartridges in a field next to my parents' house next to Armentières. I was eight years old.  Then shrapnel, schrapnell balls, darts... That's how I became a historian. When I was 18, we used to walk through the fields with a metal detector to find our happiness. It was my time in the army as a research-writer in a research centre that made me love the orders of chivalry. I've been collecting them for 24 years now. Christophe
    • Thank you for your most interesting comment. The thrill of the chase didn't interest me in the beginning but over time it started to overshadow the act of simply adding yet another medal or group to the collection. Regards Brian  
    • I know the way I got into collecting is like so many other people; through a sibling. I also know that my love of history is barely unique in a place like this. So I know I have a shared background with many people. A less shared area - perhaps - is that I've always loved the thrill of the chase. When I decide I want, say, a 1914 trio with an original bar, to a cavalry unit, the utter thrill of getting out there and, (a) finding groups that fit the criteria and, (b) comparing them re: ranks, uni
×
×
  • Create New...