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More Challenge Coins


speagle
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Here is a coin that came from a specific commander. As stated on the front, "Presented by the Deputy Commander" also visible is the "Three Star" flag showing the Deputy Commanders rank. This coin was presented to me by the Deputy Commander of Central Command who was LTG John Abizaid in 2003. I received this one for missions performed in Iraq while serving with SOCCENT, whose emblem is on the front of the coin. Special Operations Command Central= SOCCENT, along with the other branch emblems involved in Central Command. Scott.

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Here is another coin that is identifiable to a unit commander. I received this from the Assistant Adjutant General of the Michigan National Guard for services in Iraq. Again, the flag of a Brigadier General can be seen along with the individual SSI of the Army units in the Michigan National Guard. As the coin reads, this one is for excellence, so it can be set aside from a commemorative or unit identification piece. Scott.

2449168780105252184S600x600Q85.jpg

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This one is a bit different than the others, it is for a battalion level unit. As you can see it is numbered by the maker and the records of these numbers are kept at the battalion headquarters. So, this coin and number match to my name and rank and so on... How long the records are kept is not known to me and this is just one commanders way of presenting coins. I thought this quite fancy as it is just a Corps Support Battalion and the Commander was a Lt. Colonel, as seen on the reverse. It does however make this coin more researchable theoretically, and it would probably be quite easy to track down the name of the officer who awarded it.

The last thing I would mention here is that individual commanders have great discretion when ordering coins. These coins represent the commander and not the unit. When that commander leaves for another unit, the coin will almost certainly change with hte new commander. So there are literally thousands of designs available but here are a few ways to tell awarded or issued coins from commemorative or souvenir coins. Thanks, Scott.

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Edited by 2xvetran
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As you can see by the items on the coin, this represented acknowledgement to a specific group (Task Force 214) who were involved in the security (land and air) and the transport of Minuteman missles stationed at Francis E. Warren AFB, Cheyenne, Wyoming.

That's it for now.

More in a few days

Ed

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All of them - absolutely amazing ! OK - one or two are cliches in their design, but the majority are very well done. I can understand the attraction in collecting them - however, I have to say - why am I not surprised that the USAF have one as a bottle opener........

REF #89:

I KNOW you're just waiting for a response---so---here it is:

We just want to be prepared when we "drop in" and save all those "Jar Heads" and "Grunts" :whistle:

See ya

Ed

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  • 2 years later...

I'll revive this thread with a group shot of the Challenge Coins I accumulated over 30 years in the Army. My unit coins from the 3rd ACR and 10th Mountain Div are in the circular spots in the front. The rest were given to me by various US senior officers, officials, commanders etc. It also includes foreign coins from South Korea, Australia, Poland, Slovenia, Croatia, as well as NATO, and probably a couple I forgot. A bunch more in a forgotten box. These are only the "good" ones.

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  • 3 weeks later...

IG - I think an excellent topic to bring back to life. I think examples have been shown from different Countries, however

it seems to be something adopted by the US Services ? A great way of inexpensively thanking someone for visiting - and

a memento for them to remember you.

Please continue to show new examples everyone - this has built-up quite a following. Mervyn

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 5 months later...

I was amazed to see that we have reached over 8,000 posts on this subject. I have now 'pinned' it

and hopefully, members will add even more of their collections. For myself, I must say that from the

very first post that I found this to be of interest - collectables for the future. Mervyn

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Shame on me, that I´ve missed this thread until now!!

Here are my two coins:

Above: Gebirgspionierbataillon 8 (Mountain-Engineer-Bataillon 8) The unit where I did my military service

Below: Pionierbataillon 905 (Engineer-Bataillon 905). The unit where I´m doing my reserve training exercises.

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