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Royal Artillery badges


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In case, you are interested... :whistle: (Waiting for Chris' comments... :rolleyes: )

"THE CAP BADGE OF THE ROYAL REGIMENT OF ARTILLERY

The gun badge for all members of the Royal Regiment of Artillery was introduced in 1902 to be worn in the Service Dress Cap by all ranks of the Regiment (Regular Army).

The design of the badge derives from the Coat of Arms of the Royal Regiment of Artillery which was granted to the Regiment in July 1832 by His Majesty King William IV. The Royal arms and supporters with a cannon and the motto "Ubique quo fas et gloria du######". This was amended in 1833 to "Ubique" and "Quo fas et gloria du######", which translates to "Everywhere" and "Whither right and glory lead".

The gun used is said to be a Smooth Bored Muzzle Loading 9 pounder with a wooden trail, the trail was changed to steel in 1872.

The gun badge has both mottoes of the Regiment UBIQUE (EVERYWHERE) on the upper scroll and QUO FAS ET GLORIA DU###### (WITHER RIGHT AND GLORY LEAD) on the lower scroll. A modified design was worn by members of the Territorial Force (laurel spray replaced UBIQUE) and the Volunteers (the word VOLUNTEERS replaced UBIQUE).

It was made in brass for Soldiers, also bronze and gilt with a raised wheel for Officers.

The Bronze version is worn on the Service Dress Cap and on the flap of a brown leather pouch attached to a brown leather shoulder belt worn by Officers in Service Dress.

The Gilt version is worn on the Number 1 Dress Cap and on the flap of a black leather pouch attached to a shoulder belt worn by Officers in some forms of dress.

A plastic version was produced during World War 2 for wear by Other Ranks on the Cap General Service (a large khaki gabardine beret).

A brass version with a revolving raised wheel was produced privately for sale through the canteens, the Royal Artillery Association sells a similar version in anodised aluminium.

In 1954 the crown was changed to the St. Edward's Crown.

Marc J Sherriff © April 1997" (re-copied from Great War Forum)

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Frank, the crown-less one is a "gun badge". This is a sleeve badge worn above three chevrons as part of the rank insignia to designate a sergeant. It also can be worn by warrant officers on their sleeves to designate "Master Gunner".

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Frank, the crown-less one is a "gun badge". This is a sleeve badge worn above three chevrons as part of the rank insignia to designate a sergeant. It also can be worn by warrant officers on their sleeves to designate "Master Gunner".

Really? Is it still worn nowadays? Curious I've never before noticed that on a Canadian uniform. Although our uniforms now greatly vary from the British ones, our combat arms have retained most traditions from the british. Hmmm... Interesting, will definitely have to look closer next time. Thanks!

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  • 2 weeks later...

Really? Is it still worn nowadays? Curious I've never before noticed that on a Canadian uniform. Although our uniforms now greatly vary from the British ones, our combat arms have retained most traditions from the british.

Dunno about these days, but certainly they were back in the "battledress days".

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  • 2 years later...

Frank, the crown-less one is a "gun badge". This is a sleeve badge worn above three chevrons as part of the rank insignia to designate a sergeant. It also can be worn by warrant officers on their sleeves to designate "Master Gunner".

Here is a photo of my grandad taken circa WWI.

We can see the "gun badge" in wear above his chevrons.

BTW,nice badges Rick. ;)

Regards,Martin.

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  • 6 months later...

Nice examples. Thanks for sharing them

:cheers;

Larry

Thanks Larry

Lovely badges Jerry.

I really like the NCO sleeve badge with the back plate.

I've seen the pennants before,just great.

Cheers,Martin.

Thanks Martin. Good to see another friend here.

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