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General Gordon's Star for the Siege of Khartoum - different suspender


sabrigade
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This is a recent addition to my collection and I purchased it from one of my sources in the Sudan.

It is not suspended by a ring from a crescent and star which is the usually accepted method.

The "rust' in the suspension bar is actually threads from the original crimson ribbon.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The star after it has been mounted.

The ribbon was given to me by a member of this Forum who has done a major amount of research on this medal.

In his opinion, the original ribbon was half inch wide red braid that was found on contemporary Egyptian military uniforms.

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Hello Will, what a lovely collection and congratulations on your find!

I know absolutely nothing about these but it strikes me how similar the design appears to the Ottoman Order of Medjidie.

Was the 'awarding authority' Egypt / Ottoman Empire? Who would have received this award?

Gavin

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Hi Gavin,

The Gordon Star is in many ways a unique award and is very interesting.

There are many questions regarding its issue and history that have not and may never be answered.

The awards were apparently sand cast by a well known Khartoum jeweler. It has also been said that the awards were cast from General Gordon's Turkish Order of the Mejidieh.This fact has not been confirmed.

It would appear as if the Order used was for the Crimean War period during which General Gordon was an active participant as a junior Sapper officer. He was awarded the Turkish Order for his Crimean service.

The star has the words in Arabic for "The Siege of Khartoum" and the date of 1301 which is theHegira year for the year of the siege, 1884.

As far as it has been ascertained, the awards were given in three categories:

Silver gilt. These were awarded to senior military officers, senior government officials and senior civilian inhabitants of Khartoum. According to the Medal Yearbook, some recipients had to purchase their medals and the proceeds went into a fund to feed the poor. A very good example is in the Khalifa's House Museum in Omdurman.

Silver. Awarded to junior officers.

Pewter. This version was awarded to the junior members of Gordon's garrisson and was also given to female servants and scholars in Khartoum. This is by far the more common version and I have three examples in my collection which I have sourced in the Sudan.

There are some more knowledgable members on the Forum who may be able to add more details.

Regards,

Will

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Thanks Will, for sharing this fascinating history!

I can assume these are extraordinarily rare so congratulations on your find.

The examples you have appear to be in superb condition.

Gavin

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Thanks Gavin,

I have all my medals mounted and "cleaned" by a proffessional for display as I find that it is the best way to preserve and care for the collection.

This is a fascinating period of history.

Regards,

Will

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Guest IMHF

Here is a cover page of a book from my collection of General Gordon; you can see he is wearing the Order on his neck. This is a very beautiful piece Will, thank you for sharing it with us.

Thank you

Lorenzo

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