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Hello,

I'm new to the area of collecting Met Police medals and was hoping that someone could help with any information regarding the following two individuals who's medals (both 1887 Jubilee) are now in my collection:

PC Thomas Channing (B Div), WarrantNumber:50369 Joined: 11 May 1868, Left: 04 Jun 1894.

PC James Keylock (W Div), WarrantNumber:60889. Joined: 30 Oct 1876, Left: 24 Sep 1889.

I managed to find the above info on the NA website in the Register of Leavers but was hoping that somebody could add anything further... collar numbers, stations served at etc?

Thanks in advance and any help at all would be most appreciated.

Regards,

Rod

Edited by Grevvy

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Not much info I'm afraid - James Thomas Keylock original joined Y Div (Highgate) when he attested for the Met Police - copy of his signature below from the Attestation Register

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Keylock is a very unusal name, I could only find a couple of others of that name in the Met. There was also a PC Thomas Keylock Warrant Number 84176 who served in N Div (Islington) 27/06/1898 - 01/08/1919 and received the 1902 and 1911 Medals. He was dismissed for going on Strike in 1919

Given his first name is James Keylock's middle name it could be his son - checking out the censuses for 1891 and 1901 might confirm this.

Here is your man in the 1881 census, looks like he was living in a Police Section House at Causeway Police Station in Mitcham then.

Household:

Name Relation Marital Status Gender Age Birthplace Occupation

Thomas MC KENNA Lodger U Male 38 Ireland Police Constable

Henry NEIGHBOUR Lodger U Male 26 Hammersmith, Middlesex, England Police Constable

James LYNCH Lodger U Male 26 Carshalton, Surrey, England Police Constable

James KEYLOCK Lodger U Male 24 Cirencester, Gloucester, England Police Constable

George COLE Lodger U Male 23 Lawrenny, Pembroke, Wales Police Constable

Alfred FLINT Lodger U Male 23 Kenilworth, Warwick, England Police Constable

John QUANTRELL Prisoner U Male 30 Brixton, Surrey, England General Labourer (Out Of Employment)

Alfred KNAPP Prisoner U Male 30 Kingston, Surrey, England Painters General Labourer (Out Of Employment)

John COOPER Homeless M Male 28 Kiddington, Oxford, England General Labourer (Out Of Employment)

Source Information:

Institution "Causeway Police Station" Census PlaceMitcham, Surrey, England

Edited by Odin Mk 3

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Odin,

Thanks for the info and scan of his attestation details. Would you happen to know whether Mitcham falls into the W Div area?

I've had a look through the various census and pieced together the following regarding James Keylock;

1857: Born Cirencester, Gloucestershire. 1871 Census: Errand Boy. Address; Preston St, Preston, Gloucestershire

1881 Census: Single. Address; Causeway Police Station, Mitcham,Surrey.

1881 (Jul-Sep): Married in Croydon to AdaLucy Kennett (Born 1859).

1891 Census: Occupation is Gatekeeper. Address; 29 Gaskell St, Clapham.

1900: Died in Wandsworth (age 42).

Children: James (1888), Leonard (1890),William (1898), Charlotte (1883), Eva (1886).

Unfortunately looks as if PC Thomas Keylock isn't his son but maybe some other relation.

Thanks again for your help.

Regards,

Rod

Edited by Grevvy

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Not quite sure whether Mitcham would have come under W Division (Clapham) or possibly neighbouring V Div (Wandsworth). Looking at the map it seems closer to Clapham than Wandsworth. Now it is part of Merton Borough with three stations at Wimbledon, Mitcham and Morden.

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Odin,

Thanks very much for taking the time to look him up, Clapham fits nicely with his medal being awarded to W Div. Does PC Thomas Channing also appear in the Attestation Register or are they incomplete?

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MEPO 4/352 covers 1869 - 1876 (51491 - 60050) so sorry the Attestation Registers start in Feb 1869 at Warrant Number 51491. Your man Channing is a bit too early for these

Edited by Odin Mk 3

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There is a bit of a black hole for some men as the Attestation Register starts 1869, the Register of Leavers starts 1889. So if someone joined 1868 say and left in 1888, they would have an 1887 medal but you wouldn't be able to pick them up in either set of documents. The only option that I'm aware of is hopefully you might get him through the Police Orders showing his departure.

Edited by Odin Mk 3

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Ah, yes see what you mean! Looks as if I'll have to find any Police Orders mentioning PC Channing to get any further with him.

Thanks again.

Regards,

Rod

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