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Tom King

LNER Police Helmet Plate ?

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I think this is a helmet plate for the London North Eastern Railway police hence the lack of crown ?

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No, these badges had no crown. You have a complete London North Eastern Railway helmet badge. Well done!!

Joe

I think this is a helmet plate for the London North Eastern Railway police hence the lack of crown ?

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Tom - a rare and very sought after badge - in fact anything to do with Railways is valuable. I would say stg 500 pounds - and upwards - you could be very surprised.....

The short history is as follows -

Eastern Union Railway - incorporated 1844

Amalgamated with Ipswich and Bury St. Edmunds - 1847

Taken over by Great Eastern Railway (which later became London and North Eastern Railway) 1862.

Any other 'treasures' lurking in the background ?

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Tom, you have a LNER police helmet plate worth about £50 in that condition. A common badge, the LNER Police were a big old Force (1450 on establishment). Their badges turn up regularly on Ebay and go for £70 tops. The Force was viewed as quite forward thinking for it's time and sent their recruits to Hendon from the 1920s. The Force amalgamated with all other railway Poice forces in 1949 when the British Transport Commission Police were formed. I know a sprightly 90 year old who was in the LNER Police. Talking with him has beeen fascinating as you can imagine. You have the 2 piece version. There was an earlier single stamped version all in black that was used as a night plate and is worth slightly more.

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Tom - a rare and very sought after badge - in fact anything to do with Railways is valuable. I would say stg 500 pounds - and upwards - you could be very surprised.....

The short history is as follows -

Eastern Union Railway - incorporated 1844

Amalgamated with Ipswich and Bury St. Edmunds - 1847

Taken over by Great Eastern Railway (which later became London and North Eastern Railway) 1862.

Any other 'treasures' lurking in the background ?

THE LNER RAILWAY POLICE (1923 - 1948)

The LNER was formed from:

Great Eastern Railway

Great Central Railway

Great Northern Railway

Great North of Scotland Railway

Hull and Barnsley Railway

North British Railway

North Eastern Railways

The North Eastern Railway was the largest and most successful of the constituent companies. All of these companies had Railway Police Forces. The LNER Police was one of the largest Police Forces in the Country. It had its Headquarters at York. It had three Areas, North-Eastern, Scottish and Southern, each split into Divisions headed by a Superintendent.

NORTH EASTERN AREA (Headquarters at Newcastle)

Northern Division

Newcastle (Divisional HQ)

Sunderland

West Hartlepool

Southern Division

York (Divisional Headquarters)

Darlington

Middlesbrough

Leeds

Eastern Division

Hull (Divisional HQ)

SCOTTISH AREA (Headquarters at Edinburgh)

Scottish Division

Edinburgh

Glasgow

Dundee

Dunfirmline

SOUTHERN AREA (Headquarters at Wellers Court, Pancras Road, London NW1.)

London Division

Kings Cross (Divisional HQ)

Farringdon Street

Marylebone

Liverpool Street

Bishopsgate

Stratford

Sheffield Division

Sheffield (Divisional HQ)

Manchester

Bradford

Nottingham

Leicester

Grimsby Division

Grimsby (Divisional HQ)

Grimsby Docks

Doncaster

Peterborough

Cambridge Division

Cambridge (Divisonal HQ)

Ipswich

Norwich

Parkeston Quay

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