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Commonwealth Veitnam Service Awards


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Can someone please explain to me why it is that Commonwealth awards for service in Vietnam are so hard to come by? I see Australian & New Zealand awards for sale that go back to the Boer War, but hardly ever do I see an original VN Service award up for grabs, and when one does see them they cost an arm and a leg. How come?

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Many are still in the hands of the recipients. In both Australia and New Zealand, there is a tradition of wearing your medals, so they don't get tossed out as commonly as here in the US.

I was working with Australian aircrews (call sign "Wallaby") in-country in 1971, only 40 years ago. Not long in medallic terms.

Edited by JBFloyd
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Many are still in the hands of the recipients. In both Australia and New Zealand, there is a tradition of wearing your medals, so they don't get tossed out as commonly as here in the US.

I was working with Australian aircrews (call sign "Wallaby") in-country in 1971, only 40 years ago. Not long in medallic terms.

Well that would go a ways toward explaining it. Thanks, Jeff.

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There are a lot more on the market now, but they're expensive. In fact, Australian medals in general are quite high in price and I don't think it's just supply and demand either. I think Australians are a very proud people and should be; that goes for New Zealanders too. It's not just for the Vietnam war either, but also Korea. beer.gif

Many are still in the hands of the recipients. In both Australia and New Zealand, there is a tradition of wearing your medals, so they don't get tossed out as commonly as here in the US.

I was working with Australian aircrews (call sign "Wallaby") in-country in 1971, only 40 years ago. Not long in medallic terms.

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I agree with Jeff - even if the recipient has passed-on, immediate family do not part easily with medals. I think this applies generally to most people of British background - and certainly applies in South Africa. There are of course many exceptions - and sometimes they are sold quickly out of necessity - and often greed !

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I agree with Jeff - even if the recipient has passed-on, immediate family do not part easily with medals. I think this applies generally to most people of British background - and certainly applies in South Africa. There are of course many exceptions - and sometimes they are sold quickly out of necessity - and often greed !

I have agree too, as I still have in possession my great grandfathers(R.F.A.(T.F.) - 14/15 Star, BWM & Victory; my great uncles - (D.L.I./M.G.C.) BMW & Victory; my grandfathers(Durham H.G.) - 39/45 Defence Medal; my dads(Gren Gds) - GSM(Malaya Clasp); my own(L.I./R.E.M.E(Vols) - T.E.M.; and was custodian for my brothers(R.A.) Iraq War Medals until he got married and had them mounted.

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