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Medal of Honor - Army Version - Type VI


Guest Darrell
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Guest Darrell

One nice thing about living in the Maple Leaf ... we aren't under the ridiculous laws of the US where you can't sell or buy these MoH's. Shame as they should be available to serious collectors.

Anyway, glad I could pick this one up recently.

The plus is it came with a Lapel Pin and Ribbon Bar. I had already owned a Rosette, so that made a full set.

Hope you enjoy ....

Complete Set Obverse:

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Guest Darrell

As a followup, here is the background behind the "Backdoor" sales of 300 MoH by Lordship Industries. As Jeff indicated above, this MoH is a HLP (Lordship Product) marked medal, and not HLI (Lordship Industries). HLP predates HLI by some years. You find the HLP mark on some of the earliest AirForce Crosses made made in 1965.

In April of 1995, as a result of information furnished by a concerned citizen, an undercover FBI Agent attended a military collectibles show that was being held in Totowa, New Jersey. This agent was able to purchase an Army Medal of Honor and an Air Force Medal of Honor that were openly being offered for sale. The purchase of these two Medals was the first step in what was to become an ongoing, lengthy, nationwide investigation. In order to authenticate the two Medals, the FBI contacted the Congressional Medal Of Honor Society. At this time, they were informed that the sale of what appeared to be authentic Medals of Honor, as well as the wearing of the Medal of Honor by unauthorized individuals, called "imposters", had reached epidemic proportions. The FBI quickly expanded its investigation and was able to recover additional Medals of Honor that were periodically being offered for sale at various shows and auctions around the country. The FBI also identified and prosecuted numerous "imposters" who were illegally wearing the Medal of Honor and who were representing themselves to be actual Medal of Honor recipients. Most of these individuals had never even been in combat and some were never in any branch of military service. The FBI confiscated the Medals of Honor from these individuals whose backgrounds ranged from a sitting Judge in Illinois, to a Corporate President in California. The FBI was also able to recover Medals of Honor that had been stolen from legitimate recipients by con men seeking to profit from the bravery of these heroic Americans.

The investigation into the source of the Medals of Honor that were illegally being sold and worn eventually led to a company by the name of H.L.I. Lordship Industries, located in Long Island, New York. H.L.I. Lordship Industries was the largest manufacturer of military medals for the United States Government and was the only official manufacturer of the Medal of Honor. Extensive investigation by the FBI determined that H.L.I. Lordship Industries was illegally manufacturing additional Medals of Honor and in turn selling these medals to a friend of the owner of the company. This individual would then go around the country re-selling the Medals of Honor to anyone who was willing to pay his price.

These actions were not only a violation of the federal law, but also were an insult to the brave soldiers who earned their Medals through blood and sacrifice. On December 3, 1996, H.L.I. Lordship Industries entered a corporate guilty plea in United States District Court, Newark, New Jersey. They admitted to illegally manufacturing and selling at least 300 Medals of Honor during the time period of 1991 through 1994. H.L.I. Lordship Industries was fined the maximum amount allowed under Federal Sentencing Guidelines and subsequent legislation has prevented them from receiving future government contracts.

Edited by Darrell
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Guest Darrell

Digging through more online information and other forums ... I've manage to piece together some information re: HLP vs. HLI. or LI GI.

Some known awarded MoH's from the very early 70's Vietnam era had the maker Mark HLP NYC. These medals also contained the pre 1964 (or type V) MoH cravat pad. This halmark is known to have existed on pre-1964 MoH's. This indicates that Lordship used this maker mark in 1964 and earlier. Obviously older stock was used past when the Type VI medals came into effect in 1964 (with the current style cravat).

Lordship continued to use the HLP NYC maker mark up until around the very late 60's or early 70's when they switched to their name to HLI and changed the maker mark on the medals they made accordingly. A known awarded MoH to a soldier from Vietnam era of 1969 was marked HLP GI.

In summary based on period evidence and actual issued medals, the example of mine posted above would be dated Mid to late 60's most likely.

It could be assumed that the 90's backdoor medals were likely marked HLI GI or LI GI that you encounter on many medals made during the 80's or 90's.

Edited by Darrell
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