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Swimming White Dragon WW2 Shoulder Patch


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Hi guys,

I have a picture of a soldier in WW2 who has a shoulder patch which looks like a swimming white dragon.

Has anyone seen this before? What is it?

The soldier was a commando with no 2 Cdo., then with 43 Cdo. Royal Marines

Picture attached.

Thanks

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Hi - Jad - welcome to GMIC. With the known association to British Commandoes, I am surprised that you did not find reference to the badge. It is of course Pegasus - the winged horse badge worn on both shoulders by Commandoes. The horse is usually in maroon and the white might have a connection with spheres of operation - as Steve has suggested. However, I'm sure our many experts on this subject will set you right.

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I think this is the badge\flash for the Land Forces Adriatic.

This photo taken by Derrick Jackson who ended up at Land Forces Adriatic HQ in 1943 should clinch it. He describes the emblem as Pegasus although it bears little resemblance to the airborne forces flash described by Mervyn- and, I agree, it does look like it's swimming. Maybe it's a reference to the raiding missions that set out from Bari across the Adriatic to German-occupied Yugoslavia.

In his memoir at <http://www.britain-at-war.org.uk/ww2/Derrick_Jackson/html/adriatic_hq.htm> he writes:

"In no time we entered the outskirts of Bari and through the streets we drove, eventually pulling up outside a M.P.s building to ask our way. We were directed to a large building about three stories high. A sergeant came out and instructed our driver to drive through a large archway in the middle of the building. This led into a large space where several vehicles were parked. I noticed all of them had large signs on them of a horse with wings and the words L.F.A. This was the designation sign Pegasus the flying horse, represented Land Forces Adriatic." (His punctuation)

JF

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This photo taken by Derrick Jackson who ended up at Land Forces Adriatic HQ in 1943 should clinch it. He describes the emblem as Pegasus although it bears little resemblance to the airborne forces flash described by Mervyn- and, I agree, it does look like it's swimming. Maybe it's a reference to the raiding missions that set out from Bari across the Adriatic to German-occupied Yugoslavia.

In his memoir at <http://www.britain-at-war.org.uk/ww2/Derrick_Jackson/html/adriatic_hq.htm> he writes:

"In no time we entered the outskirts of Bari and through the streets we drove, eventually pulling up outside a M.P.s building to ask our way. We were directed to a large building about three stories high. A sergeant came out and instructed our driver to drive through a large archway in the middle of the building. This led into a large space where several vehicles were parked. I noticed all of them had large signs on them of a horse with wings and the words L.F.A. This was the designation sign Pegasus the flying horse, represented Land Forces Adriatic." (His punctuation)

JF

This makes sense... The other documentation I have shows LFA CMF (Attached)

He was 2 Cdo. 43 Cdo. and COPP - not sure what the order is.

I have his army number, how do I go around getting records? I have lots of pictures of him but he never talked about the war and unfortunately passed away in 1986.

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If you have the party's Army number, I would imagine the UK National Archives at Kew would be a good starting place. This is not my area of expertise, although I have done my own research there (mainly C18th and early C19th), relying on pointers from others and feeling my way through the catalogue (in situ and online). One afternoon I found myself looking at a scan of my father's citation for his M.C. from 1943, scribbled with Monty's approval. It was surprisingly moving. I would start there.

Reading that disability form you may be interested to read the rest of Derrick Jackson's description of his arrival: "We unloaded our kit and formed up in ranks, a sergeant came towards me and three other corporals. "Follow me, welcome to Bari and Fort of Tears". This disheartened me slightly, wondering why Fort of Tears. However this I found was his way of greeting, I found later it was quite the opposite to a fort of tears."

It would seem your chap's experience was different- but then Jackson was excused boots, designated 'C.I.' having been left lame and deaf after getting the wrong side of a German grenade.

Good luck.

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