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Japanese Victory Medals


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Just got the lot for 180USD including all the charges. I think it is OK price. Encourage me! :)

Increasd my Japanese collection from zero to something. :)

 

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Don't know why the photos are horizontal.  :speechless:

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Edited by Egorka
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Considering your post regarding this being an expensive hobby I think you did alright at $180. I would suggest that you attempt to always purchase your Japanese medals etc. with their original boxes, as you have done here.  I made the mistake of purchasing some without their boxes and then later on either purchased the box or in most cases purchased the medal and box together and then placing the origial in my "surplus box", where it will probably stay until my heirs sell off the collection.

Regards

Brian

 

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On 16/09/2016 at 02:03, Egorka said:

Just got the lot for 180USD including all the charges. I think it is OK price. Encourage me! :)

Increasd my Japanese collection from zero to something. :)

image.jpeg

 

Hello Egorka,

A nice pick up of a few Japanese pieces.  I would echo what Brian has already said and attempt to obtain Japanese pieces with their original boxes.  As vic collectors we are fortunate that Japanese medals come with such attractive boxes which also makes it easier to keep the items in good condition.  You will find it a challenge to obtain Japanese groups as a complete set as they are often split up for short-term profits.

The most difficult aspect is to obtain a Japanese medal, with the box and the corresponding award certificate.

Good luck on the start of your journey.  I am sure there will be many vic collectors on this forum that will be able to provide assistance and help should you so need it.

Regards,
Rob
 

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  • 1 year later...
  • 1 year later...
  • 1 year later...
16 hours ago, graham said:

Ura87,

Nice medal. Have you been able to translate what the stamp says on the ribbon?

Unfortunately I don't know, but the first character is 大 "Tai" may next 正 "shō"...

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 30/08/2020 at 18:03, Ura87 said:

Unfortunately I don't know, but the first character is 大 "Tai" may next 正 "shō"...

Taisho would make sense as this is how the Japanese traditionally number their years, based on the year of the reign of the current emperor. Taisho 3 is 1914, Taisho 8 is 1919. The Taisho period continued until 1926 when the Showa period started under Emperor Hirohito.

I just checked my Japanese victory medal (with original ribbon) for a stamp hidden by the ribbon but I don't have one. So the question is how often do you see such a medal with a stamp and why would some ribbons have them and others not. The other possibility that occurs is that the size and shape of this stamp looks like a Hanko, the individual and unique stamps that all Japanese people use to identify themselves on official documents (instead of the Western signature). Could it be that someone has personalised their medal?

This is my medal - not the prettiest ribbon, but I did buy it at a flea market in Tokyo so it feels authentic 🙂

 

DSC02086 (2).JPG

DSC02087 (2).JPG

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On 14/09/2020 at 13:46, sumserbrown said:

Taisho would make sense as this is how the Japanese traditionally number their years, based on the year of the reign of the current emperor. Taisho 3 is 1914, Taisho 8 is 1919. The Taisho period continued until 1926 when the Showa period started under Emperor Hirohito.

I just checked my Japanese victory medal (with original ribbon) for a stamp hidden by the ribbon but I don't have one. So the question is how often do you see such a medal with a stamp and why would some ribbons have them and others not. The other possibility that occurs is that the size and shape of this stamp looks like a Hanko, the individual and unique stamps that all Japanese people use to identify themselves on official documents (instead of the Western signature). Could it be that someone has personalised their medal?

This is my medal - not the prettiest ribbon, but I did buy it at a flea market in Tokyo so it feels authentic 🙂

 

DSC02086 (2).JPG

DSC02087 (2).JPG

It really can be Hanko. I completely forgot about it.

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