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As we start out, we can use this thread for Thai (Siamese) Victory Medals, variations in medals/ribbons, etc.

Tim :cheers:

Here are a couple of pics of my Siam and a Brazil vic on loan for reference. Once I work with my temperamental scanner I'll post others.

I hope these help.

Regards,

Rob

Edited by IrishGunner
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Hi Paul,

According to Laslo, approximately 1500 medals were issued, though he goes on to only call out about 1200 personnel that actually went in theatre in 1918. Of those, it appears the motor transport personnel were probably the ones that really earned it as they were heavily shelled by artillery. The pilots were still in training when the armistice was signed. Though they were probably the smallest force and came in around September 1918, they were the source of national pride back home.

I haven't got one yet and am hoping to trip over one some day during my visits to my family over there. Not much chance though, if they still exist, I imagine they wouldn't be in good shape or you really have to watch out for copies. Not a concern maybe back in the 1920's, but these days, everything is copied and pretty well at that.

I have only seen a handful for sale that I would even consider geniune or close enough to really look at it. Lot's of copies on the market and even those are expensive.

Tim

A couple examples that I've seen for sale over the recent years. Most are three figures$$$

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You guys have some amazing pieces in your collection. I had never seen a Siam piece before. How many were awarded? I am scared to think of what they go for!

Hello Paul R and others,

I picked my original Siam vic up early last year in Sydney, Aust after a long-ish search. As Tim B has indicated they are not cheap either.

While both the Siam and Brazil vic are the scarcest of the set I would say that the Brazil vic is in fact the harder one to obtain.

I will post better pics of obverse & reverse of the one in my collection shortly.

Regards,

Rob

Edited by RobW
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Hi Gents,

One one of my Googling excursions I've come across this thread on a French site which deals with the Siam vic. It has some admirably large, clear photos of the variants and some discussion of the makers.

http://zitocland.forumpro.fr/t15359-siam-interalliee

Hope it's of interest,

Bill

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Hi Bill,

Again the name of Mike Shank, haunts with its falsification.

I still don't have a Vic Siam, I am very careful in the search. This information is important for this acquisition. Thanks.

Regards

Lambert

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I have noticed this bidder, bids on a lot of things. When he sets his mine to the fact that he wants it, he put a very high number so matter what you bid you will lost. He just won all four items and all four are sand casted items?

1. Cuban sand casting = $236.50 item # 260946754425

2. Greek sand casting = $224.50 item #250985650285

3. Italian sand casting = $52.02 item #250985646621

4. Siam sand casting $235.95 ( the sand cast was of the repro medal not the original one). item #250985637512

I post this to say to all members if you need help in ID-ing something reach out to one of the many forum members for a second opinion by sending them a email.

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To all,

The French firm of M. Delande (Paris) produced reproductions, including cast copies, of all the vic series. This was during the late 1920s and early 1930s timeframe.

Regards,

Rob

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Hi Rob.

These are the medals of Cuba, Brazil and Siam you see, are the most expensive .. :unsure::(

Lambert

Hello Lambert,

You would indeed be correct that those three are becoming much harder to find. As for the Siam vic there are a number of options although, as you have suggested, they are all expensive.

There is an official one listed at eMedals:

https://www.emedals.com/Pages/DirectSale/DirectSaleItemDetails.aspx?id=8418

and a number of reproduction type 2's, as described in the Laslo volume at Liverpoolmedals:

1. http://www.liverpoolmedals.com/Thailand-L19534.html

2. http://www.liverpoolmedals.com/Thailand-L16416-pr-4582.html

Interestingly while the reported minted numbers for the Siam vic are lower they are actually a bit easier to find than the Brazil vic.

There is always the option of a contemporary reproduction piece, that seem to abound on the online auction sites, to use as a 'space filler' until a suitable specimen is found.

Regards,

Rob

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