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Hello!

The Maritime Department found it necessary to list all participating ships whose crews were entitled to the bars, as well as the periods when each ship was entitled to receive a certain lath. This was determined by ND G.O. No. 528 of 25 April 1920. In this document, 1241 ships were listed, of which 105 ships were qualified by two slats, although only one lath can be issued to the crew.

Who has the text of ND G.O. No. 528?

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Hello Oliver,

The list of Naval clasps and eligible ships is contained in print in the book 'The Call of Duty'.  There is also numerous websites that have the complete listing.  If you search for 'Naval clasps and service credits' you should be successful in your search.

Regards,
Rob

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Gentlemen,

I regularly look through the US vics offered on eBay, and over time I’ve noticed that in some cases the suspension knob seems to be very insecurely attached to the planchet, with a very small area of solder.

I started to look at all the examples offered on eBay, as well as those on this thread and in my collection, and I think I’ve identified 3 variants of the knob-to-planchet soldering:

Type 1 – the solder bead extends almost the full width of the knob, or even wider.

Iip1Fjb.jpg

Type 2 – the solder bead extends over approximately half the width of the knob.

6k0LvUo.jpg

Type 3 – the solder bead is very narrow.

q9MvauU.jpg

Having identified these three types I started to wonder if they were just due to inconsistencies in the manufacturing process, or could they be attributed to one or other of the 3 firms that received contracts to produce the medals for the US Government. In an attempt to investigate this possibility I started to collect photos in which the medal and its box can be seen together. Now, I know that sellers can ‘marry’ an empty box with a medal in the expectation of getting a higher price, but I hoped that if I had a good number of examples I might be able to detect some trends.

The results for the examples I’ve collected so far are shown in this table:

Manufacturer

Type 1

Type 2

Type 3

Total

 

No

%

No

%

No

%

No

%

Art Metal Works

5

62.5

8

27.5

7

50

20

39.2

S G Adams

3

37.5

12

41.4

2

14.3

17

33.3

Jos. Meyer

 

 

9

31.1

5

31.1

14

27.5

Total

8

15.7

29

56.8

14

27.5

51


 

So, it seems that there are not many Type 1 in the sample, most of which are in Art Metal Works boxes and none in Meyer boxes; the most common is the Type 2, with most in Adams boxes and the rest evenly split; and most of the Type 3 are in Art Metal Works boxes. It has to be said that the Type 2 were sometimes bordering on one or other of the other Types, so the result is somewhat subjective. Maybe it does all come down to inconsistencies in the manufacturing process after all.

Of course, the number of examples I’ve collected is quite small, and the analysis is offered in a light-hearted spirit. However, I’d be interested to hear your views, and maybe if you have examples of boxed US vics where the provenance is known, and you can be sure that the box and medal belong together, you might like to post pictures to see if it fits my analysis – or not …


 

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Hello, friends!

Bought this! What are your opinions?

With respect!

Планки аверс.jpg

Планки реверс.jpg

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French made copies of the 1920ties

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I agree with Herman, these are not U.S. issued clasps. In my book on page 57 & 58.  I list this clasp as type 3 unofficial. The key to this clasp is the used of a upside down letter "W" used in place of the letter "M", note as seen on the top 4 of 8 clasps illustrated. This unknown manufacturer put out three different marked clasps. The lettering on three clasps  remained same on the front , it is where manufacturer placed the needed import stamp word/s "FRANCE" and "Made in France" on the backstrap.

Edited by johnnymac

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Привет! Мое недавнее приобретение! С уважением

Реплика Тип 1а о 1.jpg

Реплика Тип 1а о 2.jpg

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5 hours ago, oliver860 said:

Hello! My recent purchase! respectfully

Replica Tip 1a o 1.jpg

Replica Tip 1a o 2.jpg

The medal you posted, is in my book and is listed as a reproduction type 2.  Two things to help a collector identify this an un-official medal is: one is the ball type suspension, the second is rays around the head numbering just eleven, and third is it marked on the rim at 6 o'clock. Last, this one is covered under Section 304 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1304), articles of foreign origin imported into the U.S. shall be marked (made in) in a conspicuous place as legibly, indelibly, and permanently as the nature of the article will permit. This marking helps date this medal.

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One from my collection.

An official type 2 no clasps: -

00.thumb.jpg.2ed573fb44fc101a52412a8100d3eb71.jpg

0.thumb.jpg.da508d1e650e31a93247bfe8ee0c1167.jpg

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