Jump to content

Recommended Posts

At this point with a new Forum, we are really showing some of the different things that we can help you with for information. If you are just showing the article then members can reply in the usual way. Should you have posted for information - then the members of the Panel will reply - and then, members can add comment.

This is a nice three piece silver plate tea service - teapot, sugar bowl and milk jug. The sugar bowls used to be very big - both for the lump sugar and the fact that people used far too much. This still has the original box and was presented to a retiring clergyman in 1906.

Feel free to submit any items of silver or, silver plate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Continuing the theme on teapots , here are three very good examples of sterling silver. We will show lots of different items over the coming months - now is the time for you to send us pictures of anything unusual that you have - and to challenge the Panel ?

The three lovely teapots shown here span a time distance of 103 years - can you tell which is the oldest ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the oldest - King George 3rd. 1798. Unusually the matching stand has remained with it for over 213 years - which is rare. Both have matching Hallmarks. The style of this teapot is called a Melon shape and the stand matches the cut-out exactly. Remember, it was only a few years earlier that America fought for it's Independence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Both Hallmarks are identical - this is the one on the stand. From left : maker's mark ; lion passant - the mark for sterling silver of 925 parts to 1000. The balance is tin to strenghten the silver.

Next is the Crowned leopard head showing it is London assayed. The letter is for the date year. Finally the head of King George 3rd. to show that the duty required at that time had been paid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The next oldest is this one - usually described as being in the Queen Anne style with it's vertical banding. This is exactly 100 years younger then the one above - 1898. Also London hallmarks it weighs 775 gms. or, 24.5 ozs.. This means a scrap silver value of over 350 pounds ($560) - but, how dreadful that something like this should be melted down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This third one is fairly close in age to the one above - it is the Sheffield Hallmark and is for 1901. The early part of King Edward 7th's reign.

This style is usually referred to as a 'waisted' design as it swells in the middle. This one weighs 585 gms. of sterling silver.

Probably all three were originally part of full teasets - although you could choose to buy them alone. Time is a great separator of sets and I am quite happy that these have such high quality to them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mervyn i love your thread. Here is my personal favorite. A travel cutlery set dating from the 1780ies that i already presented here in 2007. I guess, i'am allowed to show it again in 2011.

The set is made of silver and hallmarked with the viennas crest and the numbers 1 7 8 6 arround the crest for the year 1786. There are two makers marks "CF" and "IS". Only fork and spoon are hallmarked, the knife, as it was made of silver and steel (blade) has no marks. Overall length is abbout 17 cm. the complete set has a weight of 155 gramms. all handles show an engraved "R" for Reisinger.

Biographic Details:

the full name of the family is Reising von Reisinger.

Maximilian von Reisinger, born 1776, entered service on the 9th of June 1790 and became ensign in the 12th k.k. Infantry-Regiment. He saw action at the campaigns from 1792 to 1815 and 1821 (naples?), took part in the siege of Mainz 1794 and the battles of Wagram (5/6th July 1809) and Aspern (21/22th May 1809) where he distinguished himself and was wounded. On 20th of April 1826 he was promoted to General-Major, 1833 to Feldmarschall-Leutnant (General-Lieutenant). 1840 he became holder of the 18th Infantery Regiment. He died on 28th of february 1848.

He had only two decorations. The Army-Cross or socalled kanonenkreuz 1813/14 and the Commanders Cross of the Order of St. George of the Reunion (Sicilly). Possibly for the 1821-campaign. He just missed the Sevicecrosses which were founded in 1849.

His Grandfather Joseph Reisinger was Feldstuck-Hauptmann and was nobled in 1731 by Charles VI. His father Maximillian von Reisinger died as General-Major.

In 1845 the family was enobled to Freiherrn-Stand (baron), based on a regulation from Empress Maria Theresia from 1759 that after 30-years-of-service an officer could pled for an nobility-"upgrade".

Feldmarschall-Leutnant von Reisinger was married to Josepha, maiden-name Gabriel, who gave birth to six children.

IF ANYBODY HAS AN PRINT of Maximillian von Reisinger I would be very pleased to get PN.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Josef - firstly, let me thankyou for showing such a lovely and collectable set of travelling cutlery. The condition of the silver is exceptional and the marks as clear as the day they were stamped. I hope that as time goes on that we will be able to maintain your interest. I actually think that this non-militaria Forum will attract a lot of attention in the future.

When a Gentleman travelled in those days his valet (or , personal servant) was responsible for a travelling set of cutlery. Meals had often to be taken in small wayside inns - and you certainly didn't want to use theirs. There were some Countries that I used to visit where I always had my own travelling mug and cutlery.

However, the wonderful provenance you have given to a very senior general officer, almost certainly means these are a canteen of military cutlery. The folding action was common for both sets, but the quality shows he was an important person. They are very sought after by collectors and you could be surprised at the value today.

I hope we will see more posts from you ? Mervyn

p.s. The morocco leather box is still fine inside - however, the outside could do with some help to stop any more peeling off. When they come into the shop in this condition , we usually match a good shoe polish and lightly apply.

This covers the bare leather parts and brings it up well. Try on a little part underneath and see if you like the improvement ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Blog Comments

    • Thanks for your reply Patrick, just in case some might not know what the Belgian WW1 Medal you were referencing looks like I have included one here. I understand that the small crown on the ribbon denoted the recipient was a volunteer.  
    • Brian, Thanks for initiating this discussion. For me, it’s a combination of the thrill of the chase, the history behind the item, and the aesthetics, although this latter factor may seem a bit strange to some. To illustrate this, the very first thing I collected as a kid in the 1950’s was a Belgian WW1 medal, for service in 1914-18, which is bell shaped, with a very striking profile of a very dignified soldier, wearing an Adrian helmet which bears a laurel wreath. It was the image that
    • Thank you for sharing your story, it was most interesting and greatly appreciated, it makes this blog well worth the time to post. Regards Brian  
    • Hello I started collecting when I found my first Mauser cartridges in a field next to my parents' house next to Armentières. I was eight years old.  Then shrapnel, schrapnell balls, darts... That's how I became a historian. When I was 18, we used to walk through the fields with a metal detector to find our happiness. It was my time in the army as a research-writer in a research centre that made me love the orders of chivalry. I've been collecting them for 24 years now. Christophe
    • Thank you for your most interesting comment. The thrill of the chase didn't interest me in the beginning but over time it started to overshadow the act of simply adding yet another medal or group to the collection. Regards Brian  
×
×
  • Create New...