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Wound Badge Evolution

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Sometimes you can meet executive badge with different type of attachment (not your usual two- pin style attachment). Here it is.

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And this is the original box for this badge with instruction inside.

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And here we have executive badge with same kind of attachment, but marked “pure silver”.

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Now let’s go back to the wound badges issued by different prefectures.

Basically there are two variations of prefecture badges

1) badges with prefecture emblem in the center of the obverse

2) badges with prefecture kanji in the center of the obverse

Usually both variations have stamped numbers on reverse.

Edited by JapanX

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I hope that this compact chart of all 47 prefectures emblems will make the process of identification of first variation badges easier for our colleagues.

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Let’s take a close look at some examples of first variation badges.

We will start with this beautiful Aichi prefecture badge.

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But why we have second variation with kanji-center?

Maybe this is because many prefecture emblems were created only in the late 70s and creators of the badges had no option other than to use kanji?

Here comes the name list of all 47 prefectures.

I hope it will help our colleagues to identify some prefecture badges of second variation.

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Let’s take a close look at some examples of second variation badges.

Edited by JapanX

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Only right badge could be identified (this is Hyogo prefecture badge).

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And this prefecture badge central kanji (we saw this specimen number 259 in previous appendix) reads just “member”. That’s it.

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But not only prefectures but sometimes city-level branches and even factory-level branches issued their own wound badges.

Like this beautiful Nakajima company badge.

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And another interesting example of wound association badge (unidentified).

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Only right badge could be identified (this is Hyogo prefecture badge).

The one on the left says Hiroshima.

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And now Oita prefecture badge.

Not Oita but Aichi as written on reverse.

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The one on the left says Hiroshima.

Hmmm. I wonder how many different kanjis is in use for one prefecture name.... :rolleyes:

Not Oita but Aichi as written on reverse.

Nope...The photos of reverses were mixed up in posts 107-108. :lol:

My bad.

Cheers Rich :cheers:

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And another interesting example of wound association badge (unidentified).

Referring to the white enamel badge, this kanji is the classical style of 傷 (wound), according to my dictionary of calligraphy styles.

By the way, I didn't mention how great these posts are. Thank you, Nick!

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Referring to the white enamel badge, this kanji is the classical style of 傷 (wound), according to my dictionary of calligraphy styles.

By the way, I didn't mention how great these posts are. Thank you, Nick!

Yes.. This different writing styles could be tricky ....

Thanks for info Rich! :beer:

Nick

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A little add-on about boxes for late type 4.1 and type 4.2 badges.

After examining many different boxed type 4 specimens I think that it will be permissible for me to make the following statement.

Sensho (for wounds in battle) badges usually came in balsa/cardboard boxes with gold kanji on the cover.

Kosho (for wounds in public service) badges usually came in balsa/cardboard boxes with silver kanji on the cover.

Edited by JapanX

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